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Today's News

  • Public invited to help name school

    Nelson County residents are being asked to help name the planned new high school and choose its colors and mascot.

    The second high school in the district will be built on Ky. 245 bear Cedar-Fil. Communities attending the new school will include New Haven, New Hope, Howardstown and Boston.

    The committee charged with overseeing the naming process is asking for suggestions from the public.

    “We think this is very important for our community,” said Tom Dekle, Nelson County Schools communications director.

  • Kentucky author is keynote speaker at Christian writing conference

    Landmark News Service

  • Free Movie Night set for Saturday

    The second free Movie Night, sponsored by the City of Hodgenville and The LaRue County Herald News, is Saturday.

    The event coincides with the Goodtime Cruisers classic car cruise-in which will spotlight muscle cars.

    The movie begins at 7 p.m.

    Last month’s movie “Stuart Little” was geared toward children. This weekend’s movie is the classic suspense film “North by Northwest.”

  • K-9 officer now nationally certified

    Andy, the K-9 officer of the LaRue County Sheriff’s Department, is now a nationally certified drug dog.

    Andy and his handler, Deputy Russell McCoy, attended a day-long session in Murfreesboro last week. The 3-year-old Belgian Malinois did a “great” job at locating the different kinds of drugs hidden at the training center, McCoy said.

    Although Andy has worked numerous drug cases in LaRue and surrounding counties, his designation as a “National Narcotics Detective Dog” gives his nose for drugs more credence in matters of search and seizure.

  • Poor attendance follows graduates to court

    On May 29, 194 students graduated from LaRue County High School.

    On June 3, bench warrants were issued for six of them who decided to skip a required court appearance.

    Their offense? Missing too many days of school.

    District Judge C. Derek Reed issued the $1,000 cash bench warrants to compel the 18- and 19-year-olds to abide by an agreement he made with each of them at an earlier court date: Show proof of graduation in court on June 3 and misdemeanor charges of intentional breach of compulsory attendance law would be dropped.

  • Fiscal Court awards blacktop, oil bids

    Bault Oil Co. of White City won the fuel and grease contracts with LaRue County Fiscal Court as bids were opened June 9 at the courthouse in Hodgenville.

    Other bid winners were oil - Apollo of Winchester; asphalt emulsion - Asphalt Materials of Elizabethtown and Marathon Petroleum of Louisville; asphalt blacktop – Scotty’s of Elizabethtown; rock - Hanson Aggregate of Upton.

    In other business, magistrates concurred with Planning and Zoning’s approval to rezone one acre at 891 Veirs Road belonging to Clyde Veirs from A-1 to R1-A.

  • Nationally known basketmaker brings bicentennial design to Hodgenville

    Residents have the chance to make a one-of-a-kind Lincoln Bicentennial souvenir when a nationally known basket weaver holds classes in Hodgenville next month.

    Martha Wetherbee, an expert in the design, creation and history of Shaker baskets, will provide materials and instruction in creation of the "Lincoln Bicentennial Penny Basket," honoring the 200th anniversary of the birth of native son Abraham Lincoln.

    The penny basket will be 4 1/2-inches in diameter and can be made in one day.

  • 4-Hers preserving the past

    One of LaRue County’s oldest cemeteries sits atop a small hill in Leafdale, shaded by ancient oaks and overgrown with poison ivy and saw briars.

    Little Mount Cemetery hasn’t had a burial since 70-year-old Kate Friend died in 1916. But most of the 90-or-so tombstones are inscribed with dates from the mid-1800s. Among the dead are Civil War soldiers, a playmate of Sarah Lincoln, a traveling salesman and the first sheriff of LaRue County.

  • Let’s talk trash - any time

    Congratulations LaRue County and City of Hodgenville residents.

    After completing our annual report required by the state of Kentucky, we have reduced our trash going to the landfill by 1,000 tons. That’s a lot of trash.

    How did this happen?

    1) Our recycling has increased “yippee” and more of us are becoming more responsible and looking at ways to reduce cost and increase recycling of nearly everything.

  • Photography workshop offered to LCHS teens

    Teen shutterbugs gathered in the LaRue County High School art room for a week of intense training and fun starting June 15.

    Teacher Monique Hanna provided photography and ceramics instruction.