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Today's News

  • Woman sentenced to five years in sexual abuse case

    A Hodgenville woman entered an Alford plea to one count of first-degree sexual abuse in LaRue Circuit Court.

    Tammy Skaggs, 35, was charged originally with two counts of second-degree sodomy and two counts of first-degree sexual abuse in 2008 after accusations made by a 14-year-old boy. The boy, according to Hodgenville City Police, is considered mentally incapacitated.

    The remaining three counts were dismissed.

    Monday, she was sentenced to five years to be conditionally discharged five years. Probation was denied and she was ordered to register as a sex offender.

  • Birthday girl bumps Lincoln

    I had planned a column about Abraham Lincoln this week because it is nearly his birthday (201 years) and he was born here after all.

    But a monumental event occurred a few days early that overshadowed any thoughts of our 16th President. He’ll have to wait another week.

    Friday, my daughter Amanda gave birth to my second granddaughter after a relatively short labor. At least it was much shorter than Amanda’s labor with her first baby.

    I was exhausted afterwards. Birthing babies is hard work.

  • General Assembly back in session

    As you read this, the 2010 General Assembly Session has convened. It will be a 60-day session in which our first priority will be developing a budget under serious financial constraints. We also will be looking at pro-life legislation, legislative retirement reform, government transparency, allowing the people to decide on whether they would like to expand gambling, as well as other issues. It promises to be a busy session.

  • How long will our United States ‘Camelot’ last?

    Not untypically, many of us in these United States believe we have the best country there is – that it has both the best political and economic systems. While not exactly utopia or Camelot of King Arthur fame, we believe it is the best humanity has yet devised.

    While I am not a professional historian, I do know that there are many major wonderful (and not so wonderful) world powers that have come and gone over decades, centuries and millennia. One of the tasks in studying history seems to be to get acquainted with these powers and what happened as they evolved.

  • Main Street thanks

    Main Street relies on help from our friends such as the Lincoln Museum, Chamber of Commerce, City of Hodgenville, board members and directors.

    The value of a volunteer group such as the Genealogy Society is easy to show in matching hours contributed toward the Historic District expansion project. The value of volunteers is hard to assess and impossible to overstate. The recent luncheon is a case in point. The Community Room cost ($100) was donated (a frequent happening for us) by the Lincoln Museum. 

  • No raise for mayor or city council members

    Hodgenville City Council met twice Monday – once in regular session and the second time as Red Hill Cemetery Commission.

    The Cemetery Commission agreed to set regular meeting times: 6:30 p.m. on the second Monday in January and July.

    City Council convened immediately after the commission adjourned.

    Members heard a financial report for the current fiscal year from City Clerk MaDonna Hornback. She reported total income to the city as $547,289; and net income of $84,187 (after expenses) as of Feb. 3. Outstanding debt on water and sewer is $3.7 million.

  • Sometimes journalism leads you back home

    As a lifelong journalist, I love a good story. Here’s one for you.

    A 16-year-old rides a 100-cc trail bike to a town near his home to apply for his first job. He’s only one semester removed from a high school typing class that may be his only qualification for the position.

    He gets the part-time job, makes the most of it and begins a career. Through a lot of effort and long hours, he comes across opportunities that eventually take him far away from home. But life knocks him around and sends him back.

  • Legislative info now iPhone friendly

    Kentuckians with iPhones will find it easier than ever to remain connected to the Kentucky State Capitol.

    The Legislative Research Commission has unveiled an iPhone-friendly way for people to have ready access to information about lawmakers, legislation moving through the General Assembly and legislative news. With one touch on their home screen, iPhone users can pull up key features of the Kentucky Legislature Home Page that have been formatted specifically for their phones.

  • Extreme Makeover seeks Kentucky family

  • Buffalo apartments a waste of tax dollars

    Every now and then I read something in the newspapers that simply takes my breath away. This time it’s the recent story about the Buffalo School Apartments project.

    I think I got it.

    AU Associates gets the property declared a historic place. This qualifies them to get federal and state money to renovate it. They get $2.8 million. Can I assume that is tax money? I think so, money we paid in state and federal taxes.

    “We’ve really been praying for this for some time,” said (Johan) Graham.