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Today's News

  • It's a shoe-in at ALES

    On Monday, every student, teacher and staff member at Abraham Lincoln Elementary School received a new pair of shoes.
    John Lear, pastor of Freedom’s Way Assembly of God in Hodgenville, said his congregation wanted to provide outreach to help local families and children. They learned about the Rural Compassion program, a branch of Convoy of Hope, that provides new, name brand shoes to rural schools.
    The church completed the paperwork, notified administrators at ALES and a group of volunteers went to the school two days in March to take sizes for shoes.

  • SPEECH: Thompson named Coach of the Year

    Bill Thompson, an assistant coach for LaRue County High School’s speech and debate team, was named District Coach of the Year March 21 at the annual Kentucky District Tournament of the National Speech and Debate Association held at Centre College.

    “I was shocked,” said Thompson, in his fifth year as assistant coach to Katy Cecil. “It’s extremely rare that an assistant receives this honor, and there are so many deserving coaches out there.”

  • Farmers rally to protect herds from a wily – and protected – predator

    Few predators in recent years have created a stir quite like the black vulture. It is loved by biologists – and equally despised by farmers.
    You can curse it. You can bless it. What you can’t do is kill it.
    All vultures are scavengers – feeding on dead flesh: In essence, a clean-up crew. But the black vulture is a bolder bird, willing to kill weakened or young animals.
    “It won’t pass up a free meal, but it will kill if it needs to,” said Brandon Boone, a conservation officer with Kentucky Fish and Wildlife.  

  • Sheriff looking for campers

     Applications are being accepted for children interested in attending the Kentucky Sheriffs’ Boys and Girls Ranch summer camp in Gilbertsville.

    Five boys, ages 8-11, will be selected to attend July 12-17. Five girls will be selected to attend June 21-26.

    Programs include swimming, fishing, arts and crafts, horseback riding, sports, camp fires and archery.

    Applicants must qualify for the free or reduced lunch program. Registration and health form are a few of the documents needed to attend.

  • Alford plea entered in murder case

    BARDSTOWN — After more than three years in the legal system, a 2011 LaRue County murder case now is resolved with the accused killer taking 45 years to serve in a plea agreement.
    After a failed mediation in April 2014 and months of motions preparing for a capital murder case, Abdullah White made an Alford plea — where a defendant maintains his innocence, but pleads guilty to avoid a possible stiffer sentence at trial if found guilty — to the murder of Kristie Allen and pleaded guilty to three other charges Thursday in Nelson Circuit Court in Bardstown.

  • Grandstand getting a facelift in time for fair

    The 2015 LaRue County Fair is a month away and volunteers have been cleaning and renovating the fairgrounds on Greensburg Street.

    “We’re slowly making improvements,” said Steve Johnson, president of the fair board.

    Volunteers are sprucing up the grandstands which date to the 1930s. They are removing rotted boards and plan to replace them with donated lumber. Johnson said work started on the north end of the stands and will be completed in stages.

    Some of the wood appears to be “petrified,” he said.

  • From Howardstown to High Grove, country stores anchor communities

    Tommy Roselle, co-owner of the Howardstown Mini-Mart with his wife, Carissa, enjoys some male camaraderie with his lunch guests. Clockwise, starting at Roselle's left, are Mark Underwood, Dean Higdon, Quinn Gray and Casie Wischmeier.

     Unlike many Kentucky counties, Nelson no longer has any of the old wooden country stores that date back to the 19th century, but High Grove Grocery comes close in atmosphere. Built around 1950, it still has the old hardwood floors and old gas pumps of yesteryear.

  • ON EDUCATION LARUE: It's scholarship time

    As every high school student seeking to go to college and his parents know, college is expensive and becoming more costly.

    A comparison of state and private colleges and universities in Kentucky for in-state students (source:  U.S. Department of Education’s 2013-14 IPEDS Survey) showed the cheapest cost for a year (includes tuition, room and board or estimated off-campus living expenses, books, supplies, and other fees) was $14,266 for a state school with prices ballooning to over $46,000 annually for a private college.

  • Filmmaker shows documentary of Thomas Merton

    Nineteen sixty-eight was “a beast of a year,” Thomas Merton wrote in his journal.

    U.S. soldiers torched villages in Vietnam, war resisters burned their draft cards and Buddhist monks immolated themselves.

    It seemed the world was on fire.

    But it also was a year of searching and discovery for Merton.

  • Park an economic boon to area

     A new National Park Service report shows that 241,264 visitors to Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historical Park in 2014 spent $13 million dollars in communities near the park.

    That spending supported 227 jobs in the local area and had a cumulative benefit to the local economy of Hodgenville.