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Local News

  • New Haven mayor dies

    New Haven Mayor Bobby Johnson died Thursday after an illness following surgery.

    City Clerk Linda Mattingly said he passed away around noon at Flaget Memorial Hospital.

    He was in his fourth year as mayor after having served two terms on the New Haven Board of Commissioners.

    He had also been the city’s police chief for 17 years.

    “He did a great job as mayor,” Mattingly said. “He’s going to be sadly missed by our community. Our thoughts and prayers are with his family at this time.”

  • Jamboree celebrates 60 years

    As he enters his 60th year as owner and producer of the Lincoln Jamboree and his 56th year as proprietor of Joel Ray’s Restaurant, Joel Ray Sprowls’ path to longevity has been like the Energizer Bunny: He takes a lickin’ but keeps on tickin.’

     “I’m like a cat with nine lives, and I think I just lived my eighth one,” he quipped.

  • EMS hosts responder training

    LaRue County EMS will host a National Traffic Incident Management Responder Training Sept. 3 at its classroom on Lincoln Boulevard.

    Mike Cottrell, county EMS director, told magistrates meeting at the courthouse in Hodgenville Aug. 26 the four hours of instruction will provide guidelines to best protect emergency workers when working an accident.

    Cottrell said the recent I-65 accident that took the life of a Glendale volunteer fireman emphasized the need for such training.

  • Several indicted in Nelson County

    The following people have been indicted by a Nelson County grand jury. They are set for arraignment in Nelson Circuit Court Aug. 7.

  • School board tax rate hearing is Sept. 15

    The LaRue County School Board held a special-called meeting on Aug. 22 to discuss tax rates for the upcoming year. The board must decide how to determine the district’s tax rates. Their options are to either take a 4 percent increase or to take a “compensating rate,” a rate determined by the state that is designed to allow school boards and other entities to keep their current rates.

  • Automotive industry becomes regional point of pride

    For more than a century, America has had a fascination – a love affair, some say – with automobiles.

    Cars and trucks are more than transportation for us. In fact, few things are so deeply rooted in our culture. After all, most of us can hum the tune of “Little Red Corvette,” or “409” and recognize celebrity cars from Steve McQueen’s Mustang to Herbie the Love Bug.

    But part of what gives cars and trucks such a place in our hearts, especially in Kentucky, is our hand in making these celebrated machines.

  • Get the skills employers want most

    Every job requires a certain mix of skills and knowledge. A welder must read blueprints, retailers must have merchandising knowledge, software developers typically need to know C++ and so on.

    Yet, the skills that many employers value the most apply to nearly every position in every field. These skills, commonly referred to as soft skills, can give you an incredible edge whether you’re looking for your next career opportunity or already on the job.

  • Applicants: Show your soft skills before you even get the job

    There’s no doubt that employers value soft skills – work ethic, communications skills, a positive attitude and more.

    In fact, in a CareerBuilder survey of more than 2,100 hiring managers and human resources professionals earlier this year, 77 percent said soft skills were as important as hard skills. Sixteen percent said soft skills associated with personal attributes and character are more important than hard skills such as operating a computer program or machinery when evaluating candidates for a job.

  • Kentucky Career Center provides free services to job seekers

    The Kentucky Career Center – Lincoln Trail offers free services to job seekers and employers, including customized hiring events and career counseling. The staff also can help students and job seekers interested in training for in-demand careers find resources to pay tuition.

    LaRue County native Lucas Chaudoin first visited the career center before his junior year at Lindsey Wilson College. Career center staff determined he was eligible for Workforce Investment Act funding for tuition for the last two years of his bachelor’s degree.

  • LCHS students get down to business

    Students in an LaRue County High School business class are learning there’s more to working than just going in and sitting at a desk all day.

    Business teacher Jennifer Bernard is doing her best to prepare her students to enter the workforce when they graduate. She’s going about it by teaching a variety of life skills in her courses. She said that students are learning business skills, such as management, public speaking, budgeting and the like, as well as things like photo editing, design, reporting, writing and copy editing.