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Local News

  • Big changes - Hodgenville 200 book

    As progress and time race along at break-neck-speed it’s easy to forget it wasn’t too long ago things looked very different in LaRue County. Just in the 1940s, a mere 70 years ago, teams of mules were used to farm. Cane was cut by hand to make molasses and horse drawn wagons were still a common sight. Here you will find some photos that were featured in a Looking Back at LaRue edition from 2001.

  • Petitioning for a wet-dry vote

    Two petitions have been circulating around Hodgenville and the rest of LaRue County to determine if alcohol should be sold in the area.

    The latest petition is for a wet-dry vote to determine if alcohol should be sold anywhere in LaRue County. The petition was started earlier this month by Hodgenville Councilmember Lisa Reidner.

  • Why did I get a newspaper today?

    Today’s edition of The LaRue County Herald News is being delivered to almost every home in LaRue County as a complimentary edition to non-subscribers of our newspaper.

    It is our intent to provide our readers with the most up to date and accurate reporting each and every week, and we’re pleased to be able to give you this opportunity to take another look at your weekly news source.

  • Highspeed chase leads to accident in Buffalo

    A teenage juvenile led police on a high-speed chase through Buffalo on Sunday, March 26 that ended in a head on collision.

    According to the citation, LaRue County Deputy Sherrif Kevin Bennett observed a 2003 Chevy Malibu on Greensburg Road traveling south at 73 mph in a 55 mph zone. Once Bennett turned his emergency lights on, the driver, who was later identified as a male juvenile, was reported to have tapped his brakes and proceeded onto Bailey Road allegedly traveling at a high rate of speed.

  • From Civil War to world class quality

    LaRue County is home to a factory that produces a product sent out to all 50 states and is worn by the United States’ finest.

    Nationwide Uniform, Inc., commonly known in LaRue County as the “sewing factory,” is part of Fechheimer Brothers Company, a Berkshire Hathaway Company based out of Cincinnati, Ohio. Fechheimer has been around since 1842 and even made uniforms for both the Union and Confederacy during the Civil War.

  • Hodgenville news - March 22, 2017

    Thought for the week: When life seems difficult, follow the P.U.S.H acronym. Pray, Until, Something, Happens.

    Last Saturday, we attended the 90th birthday celebration of my Aunt Beulah LaFollette Jackson. It was a good turnout and I enjoyed seeing 10 out of 21 cousins.

    Woo Hoo Kentucky Wildcats advanced to Sweet 16!!! They will be playing UCLA on Friday night. Sure is sad that DISH customers haven’t been able to see the ballgames due to WLKY removing channel 32 the first of the month.

  • Semi-truck accident on Greensburg Road
  • City approves LG&E Franchise agreement

    The Hodgenville City Council approved the second reading of a franchise agreement with LG&E during a special called meeting on Thursday, March 16.

    A franchise is a contract between a city and a utility company that outlines the requirements for the utility company to use the city’s public right of way. Terms of the agreement range from 5 to 20 years and the franchise fee could range from 1 to 5 percent.

  • School board chooses new auditor

    The LaRue County School Board chose a new auditor during their monthly meeting on Monday, March 20.

    With all members present, the school board unanimously approved White and Associates as their auditor for $12,500. Other auditing companies that submitted proposals were Stiles Carter and Associates for $15,000 and Carr, Riggs and Ingram LLC for $21,500.

  • Local judges participate in symposium on addiction, child welfare

    Local Family Court Judges/District Court Judges John David “Jack” Seay, Charles C. Simms III and C. Derek Reed learned more about how drug addiction is affecting Kentucky families at the Judicial Symposium on Addiction and Child Welfare in Louisville January 26-27.

    The intensive two-day conference was for the state’s Family Court judges and District Court judges in counties that don’t have Family Court. Some Circuit Court judges also attended.