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Local News

  • UPDATE TO STORY: 911 service restored after lightning strike

    UPDATE: 911 was restored Tuesday evening, according to dispatch.

    911 service in LaRue County has been partially restored.

    According to dispatch, “most” landline 911 calls are being routed correctly. Cell phone 911 calls are “hit-and-miss.”

    The system went down about 11 p.m. Saturday when it appeared a direct lightning strike hit the phone lines. The surge knocked out the trunk cabinet that controls the phone system.

  • Drug Task Force rounds up 23

    A dozen members of an alleged criminal syndicate were arrested Thursday by the Greater Hardin County Narcotics Task Force.

    LaRue County Deputy Eric Williamson, who joined the Task Force a year ago, said the seven-month investigation of a crack cocaine ring was a team effort that included Kentucky State Police.

    “The Task Force has so many resources,” said Williamson. “That’s the kind of investigation you can do with a group effort.”

  • Rock-throwing lands man in jail

    A Magnolia man, who police say has been throwing rocks at moving vehicles in two counties, was indicted last week by a LaRue County grand jury on several charges. He has allegedly caused thousands of dollars worth of damages to vehicles and seriously injured one driver.

    Gregory B. Stillwell, 37, was charged in separate cases with first-degree wanton endangerment and first-degree criminal mischief. In one case, he faces an additional assault charge for allegedly striking a woman with a rock. He faces another count of criminal mischief in Green County.

  • Students enjoy DC trip

    LaRue County High School students Rebecca Riggs and Delaina White were among five local upcoming seniors sponsored by Nolin Rural Electric Cooperative Corporation to represent the co-op on the 43rd annual Kentucky Rural Electric Cooperative Washington Youth Tour June 13-20 in Washington, DC. Selection for the trip was based on a quiz, essay, and personal interview.

  • Buffalo man pleads guilty to burglary

    A Buffalo man charged with burglarizing five residences in late December has pleaded guilty to the charges in LaRue Circuit Court.

    Walter A. Gaulke (1967) pleaded guilty July 18 to six charges of third-degree burglary, amended from second degree (recommended sentence of five years on each count). In one case, he entered an Alford plea in which he maintained his innocence but admitted the evidence would likely return a guilty verdict in court.

  • Drummer recovering from rare aneurysm

    Charles Durham, longtime drummer (59 years) and featured singer at the Lincoln Jamboree in Hodgenville, often performs gospel songs at his home church, Pleasant Ridge Separate Baptist.

    But when he rose from his seat to sing “Thank God for Kids” at the church’s Christmas program on Dec. 22, he had no indication that in less than 10 minutes he would suffer a very rare spinal aneurysm that would nearly take his life.

  • Community News

    Georgetown

    John R. Smith

    The youth had a wonderful day Saturday at Kentucky Kingdom. Rev. Jerry Wilkinson and his wife accompanied us there.

    Jovan Bell returned home from the hospital and is slowly improving. Alice Lee Thomas was admitted to Hardin Memorial Hospital and was released.

    The 149th Annual General Association of Kentucky Baptist will be Monday through Friday at the Hilton Hotel, Lexington. Guest speaker will be Bishop Alexis Thomas, pastor of the Pilgrim Rest Baptist Church, Phoenix, Arizona.

  • Park bans unmanned aircraft

    Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historical Park has adopted a regulation prohibiting the launching, landing or operating of unmanned aircraft within the boundaries of the Park.

    Unmanned aircraft include model airplanes, quadcopters and drones that are used for any purpose.

    According to Superintendent Bill Justice, this regulation has been adopted to preserve the memorial nature of the park, to prevent conflicts with other park uses, and to ensure the safety of the visiting public.

  • Messonet seeks funding from counties

    Now in its eighth year of operation, the Kentucky Mesonet is looking to build a broad base of funding and support for the statewide climate and weather network.

    The Mesonet, housed in the Kentucky Climate Center at Western Kentucky University, has stations in 64 counties. The first station was installed at the WKU Farm in May 2007.

  • Upton woman receives a new kind of home

    By Jere Downs

    Landmark News Service

    Until recently, Joann Priddy lived in third world conditions while caring for her disabled mother and sister in a wood-frame shack south of Elizabethtown.

    She cooked meals atop a wood-burning stove made from an oil drum, the only source of heat. Her toilet was an outhouse with a leaky roof and a shower curtain for privacy.