Local News

  • Campbellsville Road site purchased for new state maintenance barn

    The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet has selected a spot for a new highway maintenance barn in LaRue County.

    Mark Brown, public affairs officer for KYTC, confirmed a site on Ky. 210 (Campbellsville Road) has been purchased.

    The tract was transferred from Carl Howell Jr. and Sharon A. Howell to the Transportation Cabinet in June. County Clerk records show $75,000 was given for the land near the LaRue County Fairgrounds.

    Details for the new barn are not complete, Brown said. It will provide a “more efficient” place to store equipment, materials and salt.

  • Convicted murderer released from prison

    A LaRue County man, sentenced to 200 years for the murder of a Vietnam War veteran in 1988, has been released from prison.

    Dale Louis Brown was 29 when he was indicted and convicted for the murder of Jerry Thomas “Pete” Howard, 37.

    According to court records, Brown held a grudge against Howard, who lived in a small house near the Abraham Lincoln Boyhood Home at Knob Creek. Early May 7, 1988, he allegedly shot Howard in the abdomen and set the house on fire. Howard’s body was burned beyond recognition.

  • Inmate walks away from LaRue jail

    An inmate walked away from the LaRue County Detention Center sometime during the weekend.

    According to Diana Eads, spokesperson for Department of Corrections, Division of Local Facilities, state inmate Steven Earl McWilliams, 32, of Louisville, escaped through the restricted custody center fenced area. He was missed about 9:20 a.m. Sunday, June 27.

    Eads said an investigation is ongoing at this time and “no official reports have been received yet.”

    A state jail inspector spoke with jail personnel Monday, Eads said.

  • Fiscal Court receives state grant for solid waste

  • Technology may improve jail and ambulance service

    During last week’s LaRue Fiscal Court meeting, magistrates discussed some new technologies they hope will improve various areas within the community.

    The court is providing some funding for updating security within the LaRue County Jail. Closed circuit cameras are being installed throughout the jail. The camera system will allow officials who are given a password to access the visuals obtained by the system with a simple Internet connection.

  • Community comments heard at Mesonet meeting

    A public hearing June 22 reviewed possibilities for building a Kentucky Mesonet weather station in LaRue County.

    Western Kentucky University and the National Weather Service sponsor the Mesonet project, which builds weather towers across the state in an effort to allow counties to gather accurate information regarding the weather. The stations measure temperature, rain fall and humidity, among other things, and are used for agricultural, educational and weather safety purposes.

  • Twenty-two indicted by grand jury in June

    Twenty-two people were indicted by a LaRue County grand jury June 21.

    The majority face drug-related charges.


  • Stanton takes over jail management

    In the wake of the weekend’s escape, Jailer Ralph “Mac” Trumbo has turned over “day-to-day duties” to an administrator, according to Rodney Ballard, deputy commissioner of the Department of Corrections.

    Jail Consultant Joey Stanton was appointed as chief administrative officer by Trumbo Monday, according to LaRue County Judge/Executive Tommy Turner.

    “Joey’s taking a stepped-up role to make sure this doesn’t happen again,” Turner said. “Mac is still jailer.”

  • Camp Invention returns to LaRue County July 5-9

    The Camp Invention program returns to LaRue County this summer. A week of daytime excitement, children are immersed in imaginative play that both reinforces and supplements school-year learning through inquiry-based activities in science, technology, engineering, math (STEM), as well as history and the arts. America is facing a critical talent gap in these areas, known as the international “language” of innovation. 

  • Drug dog Andy dies

    Andy, the K-9 officer of the LaRue County Sheriff’s Department, had a reputation for being high energy and chewing on items.

    Those qualities may have proven to be his downfall. In May, Andy “apparently chewed a hole in a sheet of plywood” covering his pen, poked his head through it and got stuck, according to Sheriff Bobby Shoffner.

    Andy, a National Narcotics Detective Dog, died of strangulation or other neck injury, apparently from trying to get his head out of the hole.