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Local News

  • Friends, family recall Virgil Pearman

     Virgil Pearman was best known for his work as a homebuilder and his service in Kentucky’s General Assembly. But those closest to him recalled the late legislator as putting family first.

  • Magnolia loses power after van strikes cable

    A single vehicle accident caused a brief power outage near Magnolia last Wednesday.
    Tyler Staples, 20, of Upton Talley Road was driving a 1999 Plymouth minivan owned by Katherine Sallee, southbound on Highway 357 near the intersection of Bud’s Lake Road and Munfordville Road when he lost control of the vehicle, according to LaRue County Sheriff’s Deputy Russell McCoy.
    The van ran off the southbound side of the roadway up an embankment before crossing over and striking a brace cable for a power line.

  • Former firefighter dies in crash

     A former LaRue County firefighter died Feb. 14 as a result of injuries sustained in a single vehicle crash just outside of Hodgenville city limits. 

  • Family, friends remember Virgil Pearman

    Virgil Pearman was best known for his work as a homebuilder and his service in Kentucky’s General Assembly. But those closest to him recalled the late legislator as putting family first.

    Pearman was born outside Hodgenville, in the Leafdale community. The homestead is now the site of the LaRue County Environmental and Education Research Center which preserves the homestead of his parents, Robert and Anna Belle Pearman.

  • Plans continue for New Haven senior center

    The New Haven Board of Commissioners regular monthly meeting turned into more of a workshop on building and design as they met Thursday with the lead architect renovating Barry Hall into a new senior citizen and community center.

    The center will serve residents of Nelson and LaRue Counties.

  • Virgil Pearman dies

    Former state representative and state senator Virgil Pearman, 78, of Radcliff died Friday, Feb. 17, at Hardin Memorial Hospital.

    Pearman, a U.S. Army veteran, also owned V.L. Pearman Builder & Development Inc. in Radcliff and served as past president of the Lincoln Trail Home Builders Association.

  • United Way of Central Kentucky poised to break campaign record

    Although the United Way of Central Kentucky’s 2011 campaign goal of $1,025,000 is ambitious, local businesses and individuals have been stepping up to the challenge, raising more than $1,000,000 so far.

  • Legal Aid Clinics

    The Legal Aid Society, 416 W. Muhammad Ali Blvd., Louisville, will hold free legal clinics in February. Each session will be held at that location unless otherwise stated.
    A reservation for each clinic is required. Contact the Legal Aid Society at (502) 584-1254 to make your reservation.
    •Foreclosure Clinic - 4 p.m. Feb. 16; 11 a.m. Feb. 21; 4 p.m. Feb. 23; 11 a.m. Feb. 28. Attorneys will be on hand to answer questions about foreclosures and provide advice on alternatives to foreclosure.

  • Classes help with diabetes and high blood pressure

       What is the link between diabetes and cardiovascular disease? About 65 percent of people with diabetes die from heart disease and stroke. Adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to have heart disease or suffer a stroke than people without diabetes.
    People with type 2 diabetes also have high rates of high blood pressure, lipid problems, and obesity, which contribute to their high rates of CVD. Smoking doubles the risk of CVD in people with diabetes.
    The ABC treatment goals for most people with diabetes are:

  • Realities of prescription pill abuse drive summit

    Prescription drug abuse has become so prevalent in parts of Kentucky, people are buying Mason jars of clean urine at flea markets and under the table at tobacco stores so they can pass drug tests.
    Kentuckians are pulling out their own teeth so they can go to the dentist to get a three-day prescription for hydrocodone, the most popular painkiller.
    When they make arrests, law enforcement officers are finding stacks of food stamps that have been traded for pills.