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Local News

  • News of Record - April 22, 2015

      Marriages

    The following marriage licenses have been issued in LaRue County.

    Amanda Rae Mortensen, 26, and Justin Alexander Lee, 24, both of Hodgenville

  • Elvis and Meatloaf concert combines with food drive

    Elvis and Meatloaf will appear Saturday night at LaRue County Park and Recreation.
    Jesse Perkins and Colonel Perkins, brothers from the Ball Holler area, have been performing tribute concerts since the 1980s. Jesse began recreating Elvis performances while he was still in high school. Colonel joined the act in the late 1980s.
    The Perkins brothers have combined their concerts with fundraisers for various charities over the years, including animal shelters and the Historic State Theater.

  • Wildlife artist Ray Harm dies

    Kentucky naturalist and wildlife artist Ray Harm died April 9, 2015, at his home in Sonoita, Arizona. He was 88.

    Harm, who had been described as Kentucky's “most noted bird artist since John James Audubon,” was known for his intricately observed and detailed paintings of wildlife, in which he conveyed both personality and poetry of animals.

    He had been suffering from prostate cancer and was under Hospice care at the time of his death, said his daughter Linda Stampf of Richmond.

  • Model A club visits Hodgenville

    A group of Model A enthusiasts descended on LaRue County Friday afternoon.

    About 30 members of the Central Kentucky Model A Restorers’ Club enjoyed the Lincoln sites – while sharing their love of their Fords with local residents.

    Jerry and Annnette Kelly drove from their home in Stanton, stopping at several other locations, before arriving on Lincoln Square. Their top speed in the four-cylinder 1930 Model A was 40 to 45 miles per hour.

  • Nelson deputy rescues woman from smoke-filled apartment

    A Nelson County Deputy Sheriff is being regarded as a hero after he carried a woman on his shoulder out of a smoke-filled building Sunday morning.

    According to a press release from the Sheriff’s Department, Deputy A. J. Lewis responded to the New Haven Green’s Apartment complex on 5th Street in New Haven just after 2 a.m. Sunday, April 12, to check on a female resident. A neighbor, Johnny Bailey, called 911 when he heard a fire alarm in the woman’s apartment. Lewis said Bailey advised him the woman had been in the apartment for about an hour.

  • Twain's humor presented at Woman's Club

    Curtis O’Dell loves to walk.
    Two years ago when he was 73 years old, the Tennessee native walked 150 miles from Knoxville to his home in Hodgenville.
    On April 21, he’ll begin a journey of a different kind – portraying the American humorist and author Mark Twain at 6:30 p.m. at the Hodgenville Woman’s Club.    
    Sporting neck-length white hair and an ample snow-white moustache, O’Dell, has according to many people, an uncanny resemblance to Twain.

  • Motorcyclist injured in Magnolia

    A Magnolia man was injured Monday when he lost control of the motorcycle he was operating.
    Steven Nunn of Aetna Furnace Road was driving a 2009 Kawasaki south on Old L&N Turnpike.
    Diannia Hammond was driving a vehicle north, and attempted to make a left turn into a driveway, pulling into the motorcycle’s path.
    “He laid down (his motorcycle) to avoid a collision,” said LaRue Deputy Robby Brownfield.
    Nunn, who was not wearing a helmet, was transported to Hardin Memorial Hospital by LaRue County EMS.

  • Nolin faces $7.6 settlement

    Nolin RECC, which serves nearly 34,000 households in Hardin and LaRue counties, will pay the United States government more than $7.6 million under a non-prosecution agreement and civil settlement.

    The settlement relates to allegations of improper billing to Fort Knox under an Army energy-saving program that was uncovered in an audit report issued Sept. 8, 2014, by the Department of Defense’s Office of Inspector General.

  • Blakeman's art collection to benefit Lincoln Museum, speech program

    Walking through rooms of her home filled with a lifetime of her artwork, Phyllis Blakeman uttered the undisputable.
    “Nobody lives forever, and when I’m gone, I don’t want anyone to have to go through all this stuff, so I’ve decided to have an art exhibit and clean my house,” said Blakeman, who lives in Hutcherson Heights in Hodgenville.
    As so often has happened in her life, what Blakeman does benefits others.

  • Hardin County historical groups sponsor Lincoln film

    Two Hardin County history organizations now are part of the film-making business.

    With a $7,500 sponsorship, the Hardin County History Museum and the Ancestral Trails Historical Society contributed to the making of “‘I Remember the Old Home Very Well:’ The Lincolns in Kentucky.”

    The Witnessing History film, which will air on Kentucky Education Television and other outlets across the world, currently is in production. Board members of the two organizations met last week with the film’s producer, Kent Masterson Brown.