• Legislation awaits governor's signature

    FRANKFORT - The Kentucky General Assembly’s 2015 session came to a close after Senate and House members reached an agreement on comprehensive anti-heroin legislation and a measure to expand protective orders to include dating violence victims

    Lawmakers also gave late-night approval to a bill that will safeguard the revenue stream for the state’s road projects by limiting how far gas taxes can drop when fuel prices fall.

  • New vehicle registration system saves time and money

    Some time- and cost-saving changes to Kentucky’s vehicle registration system are being implemented in county clerk offices across the Commonwealth.

    The vehicle registration system is changing to “print on demand” decals for license plate renewals. Instead of clerk offices having to stock booklets of preprinted decals, the new decals are printed at the time of registration.

  • PHOTO: Gilbert and Costello
  • City Hall changing hours

     Hodgenville City Hall is changing its hours.

    Beginning April 1, it will be open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Employees will have 30 minutes for lunch.

    Hodgenville City Council voted unanimously to make the change after councilman Mitchell Key said he had spoken with City Clerk/Treasurer Toni Burton and assistant clerk Debbie Rucker.

    The women currently are working 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. with an hour lunch break.

  • County could lose $550,000 in road funding

     Though most drivers welcome the decrease in gasoline prices, the consequent reduction in fuel tax revenue is projected to result in LaRue County losing $550,000 in road funds in the next fiscal year, an amount equal to one-fourth of its road fund budget.

    Meeting with magistrates at the courthouse in Hodgenville March 10, Tommy Turner, LaRue County judge-executive, shared those county road fund revenue projections from a letter the state transportation cabinet sent to county officials.

  • PHOTO: Matherly honored for service
  • City Council: Read more next week

      Due to the length and lateness of Monday night’s city council, the story will be published in next week’s Herald News.

    Highlights of the meeting include:

  • Fees increase as costs climb at Red Hill

     The cost of dying just went up.

    The Red Hill Cemetery Commission, which consists of members of Hodgenville City Council, voted Monday to increase the price of grave plots.

    Mayor Kenny DeVore, who serves as the commission’s president, said the City’s costs have “gone up considerably,” and other cemeteries in the area have passed along to customers the cost of doing business.

    The grave opening fee was raised from $450 to $500; the tent-setting fee was bumped from $250 to $300.

  • Board to determine how funds will be distributed

    LaRue County has been awarded federal funds in the amount of $6,689 under the Emergency Food and Shelter National Board Program Phase 32.

    The funds will supplement emergency food, rent or mortgage and utility assistance programs in the area.

    The selection was made by a national board that is chaired by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. It consists of representatives from the Salvation Army, American Red Cross, Council of Jewish Federations, Catholic Charities, USA, and United Way of America.

  • Board of Adjustments gives sawmill operator until June 1 to correct issues

    The Land of Lincoln Board of Adjustments has discussed the operation of a sawmill on Sonora Road in four meetings during the past year.
    Despite numerous complaints by neighbors  – many of whom have attended every meeting – the board agreed Feb. 23 to give the owner of the sawmill, Mose Yoder, more time to make improvements at the site.