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Government

  • Mayor's attempt to appoint ethics board foiled

     Despite a 1994 ordinance requiring the establishment of a board of ethics, no evidence has been found that indicates the City of Hodgenville has ever appointed one.

    An ethics ordinance is required by state law. It defines standards expected by elected and appointed officials. 

    Hodgenville Mayor Terry Cruse failed to convince Hodgenville City Council to approve an ethics board one day before the council began its efforts to oust him from office.

  • Restraining order denied by judge

     Ron Mather, attorney for Hodgenville Mayor Terry Cruse, filed an injunction in an attempt to prohibit the May 1 public hearing from taking place.

    LaRue Circuit Judge Charles Simms III denied the motion for a restraining order.

    According to documents filed in the civil suit, the public hearing was “chosen at the behest of certain (city council) members” and “the mayor was not asked if he could be ready by that time ....”

  • More delays as council holds public hearing

     Hodgenville City Council held a public hearing Thursday evening to hear allegations against Hodgenville Mayor Terry Cruse. The hearing is a step in the process of possibly removing Cruse, who is in his second term, from office.

    The meeting began at 7 p.m. and was held in the sanctuary of the former First Baptist Church – which has been converted into City Hall. About 122 residents filled the pews. Mayor Cruse and his attorney, Ron Mather, and city council members with their attorney, Michelle Sparks, sat at tables on the stage with their backs to the audience.

  • Richie Farmer auction nets $21,000

    FRANKFORT, Ky. — An auction of rifles and knives purchased during the Richie Farmer administration raised $21,415 Monday in Frankfort, Agriculture Commissioner James Comer announced.
    “This auction blew the doors off all our expectations,” Commissioner Comer said. “We thought there would be some spirited bidding for these collector’s items, but we never expected anything like this. I want to thank everyone who came out to take a look and cast a bid.”

  • Illegally placed signs will be removed

    Residents, business operators and property owners along US and KY routes are reminded Kentucky Transportation Cabinet crews have authority and will remove political signs along state maintained right-of-way areas.

    Additionally, KYTC officials take this opportunity to remind everyone no yard sale, auction, business or any other sign is allowed on state maintained right-of-way areas. Such signs must be placed beyond right-of-way limits. Right-of-way fence is included in this restriction. On roads with a right-of-way fence, no signs may be attached.

  • Transportation Cabinet announces road projects

      The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet has approved nearly $2.6 million in safety improvement road projects.

    The projects, which include guardrail repair, striping of narrow roadways and sign repairs, are under the Highway Safety Improvement Program funded by federal funds and administered by the state.

    Under HSIP, the state will allocate between $25 million and $35 million this year for highway safety projects that have the potential to achieve significant reductions in highway fatalities and serious injuries.

  • New law affects CDL drivers

    The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration will soon require drivers with Commercial Driver’s Licenses to be examined by medical professionals whom it has certified.

  • Nelson deputy coroner resigns after alleged ethics violation

     A deputy Nelson County Coroner resigned Tuesday who had been serving for more than a year in violation of the county’s ethics ordinance.

    Nelson County Coroner Rayfield “Field” Houghlin asked his daughter, Rebecca, to resign, and she complied, following a complaint filed against him for nepotism with the Joint City-County Ethics Board.

    In a statement to the Standard, Houghlin said his daughter was qualified, with a degree in mortuary science.

    Rebecca was hired as a deputy coroner March 1, 2013. The position pays $300 a month.

  • Transportation Cabinet awards projects

    The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet has approved nearly $2.6 million in safety improvement road projects.

    The projects, which include guardrail repair, striping of narrow roadways and sign repairs, are under the Highway Safety Improvement Program funded by federal funds and administered by the state.

    Under HSIP, the state will allocate between $25 million and $35 million this year for highway safety projects that have the potential to achieve significant reductions in highway fatalities and serious injuries.

  • FRANKFORT UPDATE: New law may assist college-bound

    It will take some time to gather the information, but one of this year’s new laws has the potential to play a significant role when it comes to helping college students decide which career to pursue.