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Government

  • Redistricting bumps LaRue to the 24th district

    Last week, the General Assembly returned to the Capitol to re-draw the geographic lines that govern the 100-member House of Representatives and the 38-member Senate.

    It’s something we and every other state are called upon to do each decade, to reflect the differences in population found by the Census.

  • LaRue joins Marion, Green in 24th District

    The House passed a plan Wednesday to redraw district boundaries that place LaRue County in a legislative district with Marion and Green counties (24th District).

    For the last 10 years, LaRue has been in the 19th district with Edmonson and Hart Counties.

  • U.S. Rep. Guthrie to hold town hall in Hodgenville

    Congressman Brett Guthrie will host a town hall meeting 4:30 p.m. Aug. 20 at the Lincoln Museum Community Room, 60 Lincoln Square, Hodgenville.

    “It is an honor to represent Kentucky’s Second District and I look forward to hearing what’s on the mind of my fellow Kentuckians,” said Congressman Guthrie.

    “There are so many issues in the news today and I think it’s important to provide an opportunity to discuss them.”

  • City Council: Rocks, rights, agenda discussed

    Two Hodgenville residents battled Monday with Hodgenville Mayor Terry Cruse and City Clerk MaDonna Hornback over three large rocks that were taken from a construction site.

    Donna Rodehaver and Don Costello asked to be added to City Council’s agenda to discuss the removal of rocks from Costello’s property on Smith Street.
    Rodehaver passed a one-page statement to council members; Cruse asked for them to read it before Rodehaver read it aloud.

  • Special session begins Aug. 19

    Lawmakers will return to Frankfort Aug. 19 for what legislative leaders and the governor for a five-day special session to pass new legislative and judicial district maps.

    Gov. Steve Beshear said the maps will be drawn using the same 2010 U.S. Census data that lawmakers used to craft new congressional maps in 2012. That will include counting the more than 8,400 federal prisoners. That had been in question after House leaders proposed a map this spring that didn’t count those prisoners.

  • Turner’s Daily Show stint can be viewed online

    LaRue County Judge/executive Tommy Turner appeared on The Daily Show on July 31. The segment is called “Can’t Touch This” and lasts less than six minutes.

    The Daily Show’s producers contacted Turner in May after learning LaRue Fiscal Court had held reading of an ordinance to nullify state laws. The ordinance, which was not given a second reading, was in response to the state senate’s vote to nullify federal laws.

    Turner said the county’s ordinance was designed to poke fun at the state’s nullification law.

  • Grimes mentions Hodgenville woman in campaign speech

    Secretary of State Alison Lundergran Grimes – a Democrat who hopes to take Republican Senator Mitch McConnell’s job in November – mentioned a Hodgenville woman in her campaign’s kickoff speech July 31.

    Grimes told a story about Mary Lowe-Jackson, who she said was ignored by McConnell when she tried to visit him in his office.

    Grimes said Jackson had an appointment but was told McConnell did not have time to meet with her.

  • Courthouse to close Thursday for funeral

     The LaRue County Courthouse will close at noon Thursday, July 25, to allow employees the opportunity to attend the funeral of Christopher Allan “Chris” Jackson. The courthouse will reopen after the funeral.

    Jackson, 43, passed away Tuesday, July 23, 2013, at University of Louisville Hospital after a long bout with cancer.

    He was a member of Magnolia Baptist Church and Director of Emergency

    Management and LaRue County E911. He worked through much of his illness.

  • Chewing tobacco tax going down

    Smokeless tobacco users who buy chewing or “spit” tobacco such as Kentucky-produced Red Man and Mammoth Cave, can expect to pay a bit less starting in August, when Kentucky’s tax on chewing tobacco decreases from roughly 41 cents per pack to 19 cents.

    House Bill 361, passed on March 22, is mostly remembered for establishing medical review panels that can potentially lower liability costs for long-term care facilities, but the bill also contains a provision that changes the tax on chewing tobacco from a percentage tax to a unit tax.

  • 'Unbanked' Americans may be excluded under health-reform law

    A new study says that if corrective action isn’t taken, health-insurance companies could exclude 27 percent of qualifying Americans now eligible for premium-assistance tax credits under the health-reform law because they plan to require customers to pay premiums automatically through a bank account.