• LaRue and other counties recanvass votes

    The recanvass of the votes in the Democratic presidential race yielded no change in LaRue County or the rest of the state.

    The LaRue County Board of Elections met last Thursday morning to have a recanvass of the vote for the Democrat race for U.S. president. County Clerk Linda Carter said they reexamined the votes and that there was no change in the outcome of the race in LaRue County from the Primary Election held on May 17.

  • Paying tribute to our heros

    By Terry Mills

    On Monday, our nation will pause as it has for more than 150 years to remember and pay tribute to those who gave their lives protecting our nation.

    There are more than 1.2 million names on that list, about half of which were added during the four years of the Civil War.

  • 2016 Session wrapping up

    By State Representative Terry Mills

    This week, the General Assembly returns to the Capitol for a single day to wrap up the 2016 legislative session.

    While this time traditionally has been set aside just to consider whether the House and Senate should override any vetoes a governor might issue, we have begun in recent years to also use this time to vote on other bills that were unresolved before the veto recess. This year, the biggest of those is the state’s two-year budget.

  • House staked out priorities

    By State Rep. Terry Mills

    In one sense, Kentucky’s budget doesn’t change much from year to year.  A little more than half of every state dollar, for example, goes to our schools, colleges and universities.  Another fourth is dedicated to Medicaid and other health services, about a tenth is spent on criminal justice and the final dime goes to everything else.

    While there is relatively little discussion in the General Assembly about those ratios, there is often lively debate on the best way to move each major area forward.

  • March Madness in the general assembly

    By State Representative Terry Mills

    As college basketball fans prepare for the postseason, it’s worth pointing out that the final few weeks of a legislative session are not that much different from March Madness.

    The pace in both cases is hectic. Time is a factor and bills, like the teams, either move forward or see their run end early.

    The key difference is that, while the men’s and women’s NCAA tournaments end with a single winner, a legislative session can have many shining moments.

  • Rep. Mills receives survey results

    Residents of the 24th House District show strong support for a higher minimum wage, tax breaks for job creators and a statewide smoking ban, according to results of a December survey that state Rep. Terry Mills sent to 1,800 of his constituents.

  • Several bills passed in the house

    By State Representative Terry Mills

    Over the past 15 years, the General Assembly has re-dedicated itself to helping veterans and those men and women still serving our country.

    Some of the more high-profile laws enacted during that time include establishing a series of nursing homes and state-run cemeteries benefiting veterans and their families; excluding active-duty military pay from the state’s income tax; and making it easier for veterans to use their military training when applying for jobs in such fields as education and emergency services.

  • Legislative session reaches halfway point

    By State Rep. Terry Mills 


    The General Assembly debates dozens of bills each legislative session, but most fall under several broad categories such as education, health and public safety, infrastructure and economic development.

    Those last two were the chief focus of the Kentucky House’s work last week, as my colleagues and I approved legislation that would make it easier for government and the private sector to work together and that would take an in-depth look at the state’s workforce development programs.

  • Budget discussions continue in state legislature

    By State Rep. Terry Mills

    Just as it is often said that games are won or lost during practice, a similar principle applies as well to legislation.  Before a bill can clear the House or Senate, it has to make it through a committee first.

    That groundwork is especially crucial when it comes to the budget, which Governor Bevin proposed late last month. The House Appropriations and Revenue Committee began reviewing it in-depth last week.  The chamber is on track to complete this work and vote on it by the early days of March.

  • Additional filings for state office

    Several people filed to run for state offices last Tuesday after press time of the LaRue County Herald News.

    The additional filings were democrat Ricky Alvey who filed as a candidate for state senator. He will face democrat candidate Leslie J. Stith in the May primary election. The republican candidate for state senator is Stephen L. Meredith.