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Government

  • Update from your State Senator

    By Steve Meredith
    State Senator, District 5

    The hallways were packed with Kentuckians from across the state making their voices heard as we began the second part of the 2017 Legislative Session in Frankfort. I was especially heartened at the passionate crowd for the Rally for Life on Wednesday, February 8, and later in the evening that energy and excitement continued during Governor Bevin’s State of the Commonwealth Address.

  • Update from your State representative

    By Brandon Reed
    State Representative, 24th District

     

    The General Assembly returned to Frankfort this week after a brief organizational break, and the week has been filled with legislative meetings as well as the daily session. Most importantly, when we returned we heard from Governor Matt Bevin as he delivered the State of the Commonwealth to a joint session of the House and Senate.

  • Harmon releases audit of LaRue Co. Fiscal Court

    Kentucky Auditor Mike Harmon has released the audit of the financial statement of the LaRue County Fiscal Court for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2015.

    State law requires annual audits of county fiscal courts. The audit contained the following six comments:

  • Reed appointed to Tobacco settlement committee

    State Representative Brandon Reed was recently appointed to the House Tobacco Agreement Fund Oversight Committee. 

    The committee is charged with matters pertaining to the Agricultural Development Board such as requests for grants and loans, planning to establish goals, and revitalization of tobacco farms, among other things. In his role, Reed will also be responsible for developing public institution research in alternative crop development and also giving direction on the use of Tobacco Master Settlement Agreement money in Kentucky.

  • Productive start to 2017 legislative session

    By Kentucky State Rep. Brandon Reed

     

    For the first time since 1921, Republicans took control of the Kentucky House of Representatives, making our first week back to Frankfort a historic one. We have been hard at work doing exactly what the voters of Kentucky sent us to Frankfort to accomplish.

    The result of this was an extremely productive first week of the 2017 session, in which priority bills to improve the economy, protect life, and make government more accountable passed through the General Assembly.

  • Reed takes oath of office
  • LaRue and other counties recanvass votes

    The recanvass of the votes in the Democratic presidential race yielded no change in LaRue County or the rest of the state.

    The LaRue County Board of Elections met last Thursday morning to have a recanvass of the vote for the Democrat race for U.S. president. County Clerk Linda Carter said they reexamined the votes and that there was no change in the outcome of the race in LaRue County from the Primary Election held on May 17.

  • Paying tribute to our heros

    By Terry Mills

    On Monday, our nation will pause as it has for more than 150 years to remember and pay tribute to those who gave their lives protecting our nation.

    There are more than 1.2 million names on that list, about half of which were added during the four years of the Civil War.

  • 2016 Session wrapping up

    By State Representative Terry Mills

    This week, the General Assembly returns to the Capitol for a single day to wrap up the 2016 legislative session.

    While this time traditionally has been set aside just to consider whether the House and Senate should override any vetoes a governor might issue, we have begun in recent years to also use this time to vote on other bills that were unresolved before the veto recess. This year, the biggest of those is the state’s two-year budget.

  • House staked out priorities

    By State Rep. Terry Mills

    In one sense, Kentucky’s budget doesn’t change much from year to year.  A little more than half of every state dollar, for example, goes to our schools, colleges and universities.  Another fourth is dedicated to Medicaid and other health services, about a tenth is spent on criminal justice and the final dime goes to everything else.

    While there is relatively little discussion in the General Assembly about those ratios, there is often lively debate on the best way to move each major area forward.