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Agriculture

  • Natural disaster protection applications are due March 1 and 15, based on crop

    The deadlines to file an application for natural disaster protection under the Noninsured Assistance Program are March 1 and March 15.
    The crops for the March 1 deadline are: alfalfa, clover, grass, mixed grass intended for grazing, hay, or seed and TEFF.

  • Workshop focuses on specialty forest products

    Properly managing woodlands can yield more than just timber products. Under a well-managed forest canopy, an abundance of specialty forest crops and products are achievable. To help woodland owners and natural resources professionals discover alternative income sources, the University of Kentucky Department of Forestry and Cooperative Extension Service, along with Rural Action Inc., are hosting a one-day workshop on March 9.

  • PHOTO: Piggy Bank Contest winners
  • Managing the calving season this year

    Providing sound management during the calving season can mean more live calves and more profit. Some reminders on specific things a producer can do to limit calf loss include:
    Separate first-calf heifers from mature cows. Calving difficulty can run as high as 30 to 40 percent for 2-year-old heifers compared to just 3 percent for mature cows. Place them in a small, accessible pasture near a corral where assistance can be given if needed.

  • Beef Cattle Association offers two scholarships

     LaRue County Beef Cattle Association is offering two $1,000 college scholarships to graduating seniors. Applications are available at the LaRue County High school guidance counselor’s office and the LaRue County Extension Office.  Applications must be returned to the Extension Office by close of business on April 27.

  • Warm weather tempts early planting

     LaRue County High School agriculture students have started working in the school’s greenhouse – preparing growing trays, checking new sprouts and assembling hanging baskets. By May, the plants, given a good head start inside the greenhouse, will be ready for sale.

  • EQIP applications to be accepted through Feb. 29

    The USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service is encouraging landowners, farmers and producers to visit their local NRCS office now to receive more information and apply for conservation technical assistance and possible financial assistance opportunities.

  • Farm News updated 2-21-12

    Kentucky Alfalfa Conference
    The 32nd annual Kentucky Alfalfa Conference will be Thursday, Feb. 23 at the Cave City Convention Center. The program begins at 9:30 a.m. Discussion topics include Roundup Ready varieties’ performance, marketing alfalfa, KDA testing program, seed coating, alfalfa in horse and beef diets and other topics. There will also be a trade show. A $15 registration fee, payable at the door, includes proceedings, refreshments and lunch.

    Extension Council to meet

  • Barn tales: If old barns could talk

    John Poteet, a frequent contributor to The LaRue County Herald News, has a great fondness for old barns. He saw a pair of barns, standing about 400-feet apart on the same farm in the Leafdale community, and was inspired to submit the following:
    If old barns could talk, these two old barns like two old men sitting in rocking chairs on the porch of their retirement home might have a conversation something like this. We’ll call the old barns Grover and Wilson.
    “How old are you, Wilson?”

  • Beware of grass tetany in cattle

    Michelle Arnold, UK Extension Veterinarian encourages cow/calf producers to start feeding high magnesium mineral. Grass will be greening up soon so it is best to be proactive to prevent grass tetany.
    Grass tetany is caused by abnormally low magnesium in the bloodstream of cattle. Pregnant cows should be fed supplemental magnesium from 60 days before calving until the beginning of the breeding season to help prevent it.