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Agriculture

  • Getting young preschoolers to go to bed

    A recent study of 14 healthy 2-and-3-year-olds and their parents has learned more about why some young children have a hard time settling into sleep at night. Many parents know all too well the frustration of careful preparation of their young ones for bedtime, only to be met with requests to stay up later or crying out for water after being put down.

  • Sheep and goats on the rise in LaRue

    The farm landscape has changed in LaRue County in the past few years. The fastest growing herds are goats and sheep, rather than beef or dairy cattle, according to Gil Myers of Magnolia.

    Myers, a goat and sheep producer himself, said there are many reasons to start your own flock.

    “Many people, like myself, got into goats for clearing brush,” he said. “Goats can eat up to six-feet off the ground.”

    They complement cattle because they eat weeds that cattle won’t touch.

  • Chiggers, what an itch!

    There was a little chigger that wasn’t any bigger than the point of a very fine pen.… is the beginning of a youth camping song.

    Just thinking about chiggers makes me itch.

    You’ll find chiggers in the good old summertime in overgrown bushy areas, in shady humid areas near stream banks, and under or around shade trees or in berry thickets.

  • AGSTRAVAGANZA: Fresh Start ready to go

    AGstravaganza, a fun, agriculture-education event sponsored by LaRue County Farm Bureau, is looking to be even bigger this year than last, which saw nearly 500 people attend the final dinner and concert. Attending any of the individual farm tours will get you a ticket to the event, where visitors will be able to choose a free meal of either a pork or beef burger. They will also be able to watch the free concert by country up-and-comer J.D. Shelburne.

  • J.D. Shelburne to perform at AGstravaganza finale

    John Herndon

    Landmark News Service

    I had driven through the backroads to meet up with J.D. Shelburne.

    He’d done the same to catch up with a writer he knew little about.

    But that wasn’t really that unusual. I’m a sports writer who’s just as comfortable talking about cattle as baseball. Shelburne could fill the nets from 3-point land at Spencer County High School but is now working his way up the ladder in Nashville.

  • Hinton’s looks forward to AGstravaganza

    About seven miles out of Hodgenville toward Campbellsville, just off Ky. 210, sits Hinton’s Orchard and Farm Market. The orchard, owned by husband and wife, Jeremy and Joanna Hinton, is participating in AGstravaganza for the second time when the event rolls around on Aug. 9.

  • R & K is A-OK

    One of the new stops along the AGstravaganza tour this year is R & K Angus, owned by Russell and Kelly Flanders. The farm serves as the beef stop for the tour and will allow visitors to see the workings of a farm that raises Angus bulls for market.

  • Shady Rest Farms is hog heaven

    Caleb Ragland is the ninth generation of his family to operate a farm in LaRue County. The young farmer raises hogs on Shady Rest Farm with the help of his father and brother.

    According to Ragland, his family got started in the county in 1808, when his ancestor, Gideon Ragland, purchased a land grant from a Revolutionary War veteran. He bought 1,000 acres for $1,000. The land the farm sits on now was purchased in 1924.

  • How does your garden grow?

    Lee’s Garden Center Florist and Gift Shop has been around for a long time – 28 years, in fact – and is going to be a stop on the AGstravaganza tour on Aug. 9.

    The greenhouse and florist will serve as the foliage stop on the tour.

    According to Robin Lee, co-owner and wife to Scotty Lee, the business’s founder, visitors will be able to tour the greenhouse and see the plants and flowers learn about the growing process and see how the operation works.

  • Like a Rock

    The last year has been far from easy for Rock Brothers Dairy, but the family-owned farm is ready to bounce back, according to Chris Loyall, current farm caretaker and son-in-law to Gary Rock, the farm’s owner.

    Last June, a tornado came through the area and destroyed one of the main milk barns on the farm. According to Loyall, the family moved the cows that survived the storm to another farm, owned by Mike Hatcher in Russell County.

    Just weeks later, Gary suffered a devastating accident when he lost both legs in a silage chopper.