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Agriculture

  • COLUMN: Foliar corn fungicides are best used at tasseling through silking

     Essentially all corn seed is treated with fungicides to help control seed rots and seedling diseases during germination and early growth.

    More recently, foliar applied corn fungicides is a practice some grain producers have utilized in efforts to control diseases, promote growth, and improve yields of their corn crop. According to UK research, benefits of this practice can vary depending on the circumstances.

  • 4-Hers compete at District Horse Camp

     The Wrangler’s 4-H Horse Club recently participated in Horse Judging, Horse Camp and the District Show. At the District Horse Judging Contest, Carey Coffey received the second place high individual in junior individual judging. She also placed fourth in junior individual hippology. Katie Gardner received third place in the senior individual hippology.

  • UK College of Agriculture taking nominations for Hall of Distinguished Alumni

     The University of Kentucky College of Agriculture has initiated a Hall of Distinguished Alumni. The award will be presented annually to no more than two living nominees. Nominations for the first inductees are being accepted through Sept. 30. Additional posthumous awards will be presented for the first three years to acknowledge the contributions of alumni from earlier generations.

  • COLUMN: Notes from Groundhog Hill

    by Steve LaRue

    Garden of Envy.

    On my way to Groundhog Hill each morning, I pass beautiful fields of green corn, recently set tobacco and purple cornflowers growing wild alongside the road. By the time I reach my experimental garden, I feel happy and eager to see what’s changed in a day’s time. All that’s missing is a bluebird on my shoulder. Not a bad way to start one’s day.

  • COLUMN: Poison hemlock a danger, whether green or in hay

    Initial symptoms of poison hemlock poisoning can include nervousness, trembling, muscular weakness and loss of coordination, dilation of pupils, coma and eventually death from respiratory paralysis. 

    Lethal doses for cattle are considered to be in the range of 0.2 to 0.5 percent of the animal’s body weight. It can also cause fetal deformation of pregnant animals.      

  • 4-H Calendar - June 6, 2012

    Cooking Club

    The 4-H Cooking Club will have a picnic 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m. June 11 at the Lincoln Farm picnic area. Members are asked to bring a side dish or dessert item. The club will provide meat and drinks. Rain will move the picnic to the Extension Office.

     

    Rabbit Club

    The 4-H Rabbit Club will have a meeting and picnic 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m. June 11 at the Lincoln Farm picnic area. Members are asked to bring a side dish or dessert. Rain will move the picnic to the Extension Office.

     

  • COLUMN: Notes from Groundhog Hill (Man vs. Weeds)

     A new summer reality show premiered this week, but not on television. It's at Groundhog Hill. I call it, "Man vs. Weeds."

    The premise is simple yet complex: One man, clad in bib overalls and armed with a garden hoe, competes against a ferocious team of weeds for planting supremacy and personal glory. The weed team consists of four players: Johnson Grass (team captain), Cape Honeysuckle, Climbing Milkweed and something I like to call, Pain-in-the-Butt-Ivy (see photo).

  • COLUMN: Poison hemlock dangerous to humans, cattle

     Poison hemlock has been increasing locally during the past several years, and is very abundant this year. Although often seen along roadways and fence rows, it has expanded now into grazed pasture lands and hay fields.

    The concern not only comes from its invasive nature but the fact that it is one of the most toxic plants in the world. Throughout history, the toxicity of poison hemlock is well known for accidental deaths of humans and animals.

  • PHOTO: Big, big broccoli
  • Tri-county agriculture tour planned for June 20

     Hardin and LaRue County Conservation Districts have collaborated to offer a free area agriculture tour, open to all Hardin and LaRue County residents. 

    On Wednesday, June 20, tour participants will visit Bob Wade Jr.’s farm in Hardin County that illustrates an elaborate irrigation system and technological implementation in a large grain production.