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Agriculture

  • TIPS TO CONSERVE WATER

    The Kentucky Division of Water is encouraging citizens to learn how they can conserve water during drought and year-round with some simple changes in their water-use habits.

  • COLUMN: Summer stressors damage plants

     Don’t let summer stressors ruin your landscape’s good looks. Instead give your plants’ natural defenses a boost and keep both vegetable gardens producing and flowers blooming.

    Busy summer schedules can lead to plant neglect and less-than-picture-perfect gardens. When you team this with summer heat and drought that can lead to wilting, brown leaves, and poor growth, and add insects and diseases that can further weaken and damage plants, gardens can really suffer.

  • FARM CALENDAR

     Goat and Sheep Producers meet July 12

    The LaRue County Goat and Sheep Producers Association will meet 6:30 p.m. July 12 at the LaRue County Extension Office to make plans for the LaRue County Fair’s Goat and Sheep Shows.  There will be a brief discussion on small ruminant management in hot weather. The meal will be picnic potluck with hot dogs and burgers provided. All interested producers are invited.

     

    Pork Producers meet July 16

  • Notes from Groundhog Hill: Summer of Adversity

     Despite the extreme heat of the last few weeks, the garden at Groundhog Hill survives thanks to the two-to-three isolated thunderstorms Mother Nature has delivered.

    Zinnias and marigolds are blooming, but the sunflowers and giant marigolds are taking their own sweet time and have yet to open, as if to say, "Um. Dude, we're not sure we're up for these conditions."

    If you hear a distant floral popping sound in the next few days, though, don't fear as it's just the explosion of color at Groundhog Hill.

  • Test drought-stressed corn before harvest

     If corn is going to be fed as green chop or grazed, test for nitrates before harvest to be sure the crop will be safe to feed. For corn harvested properly as silage which goes through a good fermentation, nitrate levels could decrease 30 to 50 percent and can be tested after fermentation and before feeding. 

  • PHOTO: Coyote pups

     Pat Burd, who works for the Property Valuation Administrator, snapped this photo of a coyote pup near a stream in northern LaRue County.

  • Notes from Groundhog Hill: The Hunger Games

     Greetings, Vegetation of Groundhog Hill, or should I say, Tributes.

    Welcome to the First Annual Hunger Games for Gardens where you shall be pitted against your fellow flora for moisture in the ultimate challenge for survival. Yes, zinnia versus zinnia. Butternut squash versus zucchini. Only the most hardy of you shall live in this specially designed arena which simulates the planet Mercury, or at the very least, the city of Phoenix.

  • COLUMN: Snakes are usually beneficial

     Many people fear snakes, but despite the fright they can cause, the majority of snakes are beneficial and harmless. Of the 20 or so snake species found locally, only two are venomous, the Northern Copperhead and the Timber Rattlesnake.

    If you are scared of snakes, try to remember that they are useful — they keep the rodent population in check by eating mice, chipmunks, insects and other pests.

  • COLUMN: Attract birds and butterflies to your garden

     Add a little extra color and motion to your summer garden with containers designed to attract birds and butterflies. Many garden centers continue to sell annuals throughout the summer and many of these mid-season annuals are a bit bigger, providing instant impact.

  • Notes from Groundhog Hill: First summer produce picked

        There is a quiet joy you get while gardening—especially in the early morning when it’s just you, the birds chirping and the crickets singing.