.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Agriculture

  • 4-H Calendar updated 4-11-12

    Poultry Club
    The LaRue County 4-H Poultry Club will meet 3:30-5 p.m. April 11 at the Extension Office.

    Explorers
    The LaRue County 4-H Explorers Club will meet 3:30-5 p.m. April 18 at the Extension Office. For more information, call 358-3401.
     
    Photography Club
    The LaRue County 4-H Photography Club will meet 2:30-3:30 p.m. April 13 at the Extension Office. Any 4-H youth with an interest in photography is welcome to attend. For more information, contact the Extension Office at 358-3401.

  • Spring turkey season opens April 14

    Kentucky’s spring wild turkey season has been so successful the past 15 years in part because of the timing of opening day.
    “I think we’ve accomplished our goal of having a productive season in a relatively short time frame,” said Steven Dobey, wild turkey program coordinator for the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources. “We’ve hit that window between the onset of breeding and nesting.”

  • 4-H Gardening Club starts back this Saturday

    The 4-H Gardening Club will start back this Saturday, April 14, with its first meeting for the season.
    It will be held 10:30 a.m. at Lee’s Garden Center. All LaRue County youth with an interest in gardening are encouraged to attend. This club is open to youth of all ages. Parents are encouraged to attend with their children as well. Participants will learn about gardening and will also be given plants to take home and plant to begin their own garden. They will also be encouraged to keep a journal of when they plant, water and fertilize.

  • Bees are essential for pollination

    While several species of insects pollinate plants, honey bees are the best pollinators and therefore the most essential. They are exceptionally efficient at collecting and transferring pollen among the flowers of a particular crop.

  • Honeybee deaths linked to corn insecticides

     An ABC News report by Alexandra Ludka and republished in The Rural Blog links honeybee deaths to corn insecticides.

  • Farm News updated 4-3-12

    Conservation Reserve Program

  • 4-H Calendar updated 4-3-12

    Cloverbuds meet
    The LaRue County 4-H Cloverbuds will meet 3:30-4:45 p.m. April 4 at the Extension Office. Group is for 5 to 8 years old or kindergarten to third grade. Call 358-3401 for more information.

    Poultry Club
    The LaRue County 4-H Poultry Club will meet 3:30-5 p.m. April 11 at the Extension Office.
     
    Photography Club

  • DCP program sets deadline for June 1

    The deadline to enroll in the Direct and Counter-Cyclical Payment (DCP) program is June 1.
    DCP provides payments to eligible producers on farms enrolled for any of the 2008 through 2012 crop years. There are two types of DCP payments: direct payments and counter-cyclical payments. Both are calculated using the base acres and payment yields established for the farm. DCP is authorized by the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (2008 Farm Bill).  
    In addition to DCP, other FSA programs also have enrollment deadlines approaching:

  • Buttercup in pastures: An unwanted sign of spring

    One of the signs of spring is the yellow flowers that emerge from buttercup plants in pastures and unplanted grain cropland. While buttercup poses little problems to grain crop yields, it can be an issue in pastures.
    Buttercups tend to thrive in low areas of fields, generally in soils that remain wet long periods of time and in fields with poor stands of desirable forages.  In fact, many pasture fields that have heavy buttercup populations are fields that are heavily grazed by livestock.

  • Buttercup in pastures: An unwanted sign of spring

     One of the signs of spring is the yellow flowers that emerge from buttercup plants in pastures and unplanted grain cropland. While buttercup poses little problems to grain crop yields, it can be an issue in pastures.

    Buttercups tend to thrive in low areas of fields, generally in soils that remain wet long periods of time and in fields with poor stands of desirable forages.  In fact, many pasture fields that have heavy buttercup populations are fields that are heavily grazed by livestock.