• Scramble
  • Ag Tags now benefit FFA and 4-H

    Kentucky Commissioner of Agriculture James Comer has pioneered the Kentucky Farm License Plate Program, allowing Kentucky FFA and 4-H to directly benefit from the sale of Ag Tags. When a person purchasing a Kentucky Farm License plate, they have the opportunity to donate $10, which is divided equally between Kentucky FFA, Kentucky 4-H and Kentucky Proud.

  • 4-H Calendar - October 9, 2013

    Poultry Club
    The 4-H Poultry Club will meet 3:30 p.m. Oct. 9 at the Extension office. New members with an interest in poultry are encouraged to attend.

    Livestock Club clinic
    The 4-H Livestock Club will hold a clinic 10 a.m. Oct. 12 at Gentry Farms. For more information, call the Extension office at 270-358-3401.
    Livestock Club
    The 4-H Livestock Club will meet 6 p.m. Oct. 14 at the LaRue County Extension office. New members are welcome to attend.

  • Farm News - October 9, 2013

    Conservation District office open
    The LaRue County Conservation District remains open; however, the Hardin/LaRue Farm Service Agency is closed during the government shutdown.

    Breast Cancer Awareness Truck and Tractor Pull
    The Burger King Breast Cancer Awareness Truck and Tractor Pull will be 7 p.m. Oct. 11 and 6 p.m. Oct. 12 at the Hardin County Fairgrounds. Events for children begin at 2 p.m. Oct. 12. To sign up, call Tim Hornback at 270-300-8636.

    No-till drills

  • New state regs, night hunting for coyotes allowed

    Hunters may now pursue coyotes at night.     

    New regulations allow hunters to use a shotgun to take coyotes at night year round. Lights or night vision equipment can only be used from Feb. 1 through May 31.     

  • Learn the risks of prussic acid poisoning

    Producers should be aware of the risk of cyanide or prussic poisoning in cattle, goats, and other ruminants.

    Sudangrass, johnsongrass, sorghums and sorghum-sudangrass hybrids contain cyanogenic glycosides. When the plant undergoes a stressful event such as cutting, wilting, freezing and drought, the plant cells rupture which allows the cyanogenic compounds to produce poisonous cyanide.

  • People's Garden harvested early

    The People’s Garden at Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historic Park was harvested early due to the government shutdown.

    The original harvest date was Oct. 3, according to garden coordinator Steve Meredith. When he learned the Park would likely close – along with other national sites and monuments due to government gridlock – he gathered a group of volunteers to help pick beans, peppers, corn, gourds, tomatoes, zucchini, pumpkin and squash.

  • Like a Rock

     It sounds like a page from the Book of Job.

  • Deer in the headlights, now more than ever

     To everything there is a season, and Kentucky’s drivers must once again brace themselves for the annual three-month surge in roadway encounters, and collisions, with the most dangerous animal in the United States – the white-tailed deer.

    The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety estimates that each year white-tailed deer cause car accidents across the nation that are responsible for tens of thousands of injuries and the deaths of about 200 Americans. Those collisions also carry the hefty price tag of $4.6 billion in insurance claims annually.

  • Hunting ‘seng