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Agriculture

  • Farmers playing catch up after rains

    The weather is always a big factor for LaRue County farmers during the spring planting season and the spring of 2016 is no different as heavy rains and storms continue to hit the county and surrounding areas.

    According to the Mesonet Weather Service, since March the Hodgenville Mesonet station reported a total of 13.72 inches of rain. However, between March and May for the same time frame for the previous four years, the average amount was 15.36 inches of rain.

  • Cattlemen’s serve at LC Band Banquet
  • 4H Teen Leadership Academy

    Participants in the 4-H Teen Leadership Academy graduated this past week at a ceremony held at the Meade County Extension Office. LaRue County had five participants that all graduated from the nine month program.  Pictured are:  Richard Pike, Emma Bowling, 4-H Agent Misty Wilmoth, Rachel Armes and Alyssa White.  Grace Armes is not pictured.

  • LCHS FFA Recognized for Agricultural Advocacy Efforts

    The LaRue County High School FFA Chapter was recently awarded a $1,000 grant from Monsanto in recogintion of their agriculture advocacy efforts.

    In the fall of 2015, FFA advisors and members were challenged to share the message of agriculture through social media and using the hashtag #SpeakAg. The idea behind the movement was to get a conversation about agriculture and the importance it plays in everyday lives.

    During the #SpeakAg challenge, advisors and students self-estimated that they were reaching an average of 397 people.

  • Farm calendar - May 25, 2016

    Applied Master Cattleman Class

    An Applied Master Cattlemen Class on the Basics of Forage Establishment and Growth and How it Affects Pasture and Hay Management will take place from 6 to 9 p.m. on Tuesday, May 24 at the LaRue County Extension Office. The session will be presented by Dr. Ray Smith, UK Extension forage specialist. The focus is on participants learning practical recommendations they can use in their farming operations. Cost is $5 and includes a meal. Please pre-register by calling 270-358-3401.

    LaRue County Farmers Market

  • Mosquito control

    Controlling mosquitos is challenging to say the least. You may even think you are fighting a never-ending battle. With mosquito-borne diseases like the Zika and West Nile Virus becoming more prevalent, it’s even more important to know how to take control of these pests around your home environment. Learning to do a few simple things could help protect you from more than the itchiness of a mosquito bite.

  • 4-H Talent Show and Fashion Revue

    The 4-H Talent Show and Fashion Revue was held on Friday, April 15.  4-H members were able to showcase their talents in the categories of vocal, instrumental, physical skills and theatrical. In the Fashion Revue, 4-H Sewing members were judged on their projects as well as their modeling skills.  Results are as follows:

    Talent Show

    Junior Instrumental

    Anthony Pike –

    Champion; Madison Wilmoth, Aimee Hornback and Ashlyn Toher - Reserve Champion

    Senior Instrumental

    Richard Pike – Champion

  • Farm Calendar

    Applied Master Cattleman Class

    An Applied Master Cattlemen Class on the Basics of Forage Establishment and Growth and How it Affects Pasture and Hay Management will take place from 6 to 9 p.m. on Tuesday, May 24 at the LaRue County Extension Office. The session will be presented by Dr. Ray Smith, UK Extension forage specialist. The focus is on participants learning practical recommendations they can use in their farming operations. Cost is $5 and includes a meal. Please pre-register by calling 270-358-3401.

    LaRue County Farmers Market

  • Summer annual grasses

    By Daniel Carpenter

    LaRue County Extension Agent

      Summer annual grasses such as sudangrass, sorghum x sudangrass hybrids, pearl millet, and teff can all play a role for pasture and hay needs. If managed properly, these grasses can provide high yields of good quality forage in a short amount of time.

  • The other yellow flowers

    Weeds with yellow flowers are getting a lot of attention lately. I promise, I am not obsessed with them and next week’s article will have nothing to do with anything yellow-flowered!

    Last week’s weed, cressleaf groundsel, is found mainly in fields that are dedicated to grain production. This week’s weed, buttercup, is found mainly in pasture fields. We have had several concerned cattle farmers call or stop in this week with questions about how to control buttercup weeds in their pastures.