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Agriculture

  • PHOTO: Soybean Board
  • PHOTO: Eggs-citing difference

    Lou Downs of Stiles showed off three eggs from the same flock. Her neighbor’s hens keep her supplied with an assortment of sizes: bird-size, jumbo and ostrich-size.

  • COLUMN: Grain Field Day planned for Aug. 28

    The annual LaRue County Extension Grain Field Day will be held at 5 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 28 at Fresh Start Farms, operated by Ryan and Misty Bivens. The farm is located at 4109 Sonora Road (KY 84), Hodgenville.

    We will look at Extension’s corn and soybean variety plots on the farm. They include 25 Roundup Ready corn varieties (planted May 7) and 27 Roundup Ready Group IV soybean varieties, double cropped on June 21 after wheat.

  • PHOTO: 4H AGSTRAVAGANZA

    The 4-H Livestock Club and Rabbit Club had animals at AGstravaganza. Alexis Grimes and Michaela Rock showed their rabbits to Braxton Thomas.

  • PHOTO: 4H Ham

    LaRue County was represented at the State Fair in the Country Ham Contest.  Almost 800 4-Hers from across the state participated in the contest. LaRue County 4-Hers Alexis Grimes, Kaleb Miller, Emily Pearman, William Pearman and Madison Wilmoth competed in the event. William Pearman received third-place in the 14-year-old division.

  • Practice safety at the shooting range

    The cooler temperatures and lower humidity that spread across Kentucky this week made it feel more like early fall than the dog days of summer.

    Fall hunting season seems closer with a crispness in the air. And in reality, it isn’t far off.

    Spending time at the shooting range now not only is fun but it’s also a surefire way to ensure you’ll be ready when it counts this fall.

  • Cottrell interns for KDA
  • Four points for seeding forages in late summer

    The period from late summer to early fall is generally the best time to seed cool season grasses such as orchardgrass, tall fescue, and timothy (alfalfa and clover typically do better in the spring). Consider these four points to increase your success.

    First, address the soil’s fertility needs. Inadequate levels of phosphorous, potassium or limestone can limit productive yields and decrease stand life.

  • Local farmer named Champion of Change

     

    A LaRue County farmer was recently recognized by Washington D.C. and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Quint Pottinger was one of only 15 farmers in the nation chosen as a White House Champion of Change.

    “All across the country, ordinary Americans are doing extraordinary things in their communities to out-innovate, out-educate, and out-build the rest of the world.” That is how whitehouse.gov introduces the Champions of Change program. USDA recognized Pottinger, along with 14 others, during a ceremony at the White House on July 29.

  • AGstravaganza draws 800 to finale

    Last weekend’s AGstravaganza tour was a resounding success, said Ryan Bivens, one of the organizers and owner of the last stop, Fresh Start Farms in Hodgenville.

    According to Bivens, early estimates of attendance numbers show that the event had roughly double the turnout of last year, hovering around 800 attendees for the J.D. Shelburne concert on Saturday night. In addition, Bivens said each tour stop had more than 100 visitors, with most having many more.