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Agriculture

  • Student wins $1,000 for giant cabbage

     Holden Underwood, a student at Cox’s Creek Elementary School, is the 2012 state winner of Bonnie Plants’ annual third-grade cabbage-growing contest.

    Holden’s cabbage grew to 20.5 pounds. He was selected at random from among 65 classroom winners from across the state. Holden earned a $1,000 scholarship from Bonnie Plants, which delivered 21,516 cabbage plants this past season to third-grade students at 284 Kentucky schools.

  • PHOTO: Ag students honored

     Agriculture Commissioner James Comer recognized LaRue County students for winning statewide honors March 27 in the Kentucky Department of Agriculture’s Poster and Essay Contest at the Kentucky Agriculture Day awards luncheon in Frankfort. Pictured are, from left: teacher Misty Bivens; April Webb, 11th grade essay winner; Aaron Elswick, 10th grade essay winner; and Commissioner Comer. 

  • COLUMN: What's up, buttercup

     One of the signs of spring is the bright yellow flowers that emerge from buttercup plants in pastures and unplanted grain cropland. While buttercup poses little problems to grain crop yields, it can be an issue in pastures.

    Buttercups tend to thrive in low areas of fields, generally in soils that remain wet long periods of time and in fields with poor stands of desirable forages. In fact, many pasture fields that have heavy buttercup populations are fields that are heavily grazed by livestock.

  • PHOTO: New calf

     Jenny, a longhorn cow, gives her new calf a spit bath shortly after its birth.

  • 'Ornery' farmer named Honorary Commissioner of Agriculture

     After 20 years of working behind the scenes, a LaRue County farmer found himself in the spotlight at last month’s National Farm Machinery Show.

  • Farm Calendar - March 27, 2013

     Beef Producers meet

  • Watershed Council meeting canceled

    Due to the threat of inclement weather, tonight's Bacon Creek Watershed Council meeting has been canceled.

  • PHOTOS: Beef Producers
  • Turkey season begins in April

     With opening day of the statewide season just three weeks away, Kentucky turkey hunters can look forward to encountering gobblers of all ages this spring.

    “There will be a higher than average number of jakes (juvenile gobblers) compared to the 2-year-olds and older adult gobblers in our flocks,” said Steven Dobey, wild turkey program coordinator for the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources. “We should have another good spring season.”

  • COLUMN: Thistle 'spray day' is April 10

     Musk or nodding thistle is the most common type of thistle locally. The primary growth period is in the spring and summer. However, most seed germinate in the fall and form a rosette which grows close to the ground, often growing unnoticed until spring.

    The most important step in long-term control of thistle is to prevent flowering, and the production and spread of new seed (which is carried by wind). This can be done by mechanical or chemical control.