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Agriculture

  • Farm Calendar -August 7, 2013

    Rinse and return
    Empty five gallon or smaller plastic pesticide containers will be accepted at Southern States in Hodgenville 10 a.m. to noon Aug. 7. Containers should be properly rinsed and have lids and labels removed if possible. There is no charge. For more information, call the LaRue County Extension office at 358-3401.
     
    Beef producers meet

  • Wheat test results are in

    Despite some concerns over fusarium head blight in wheat this spring, most LaRue County farmers had excellent wheat yields. Growers now are selecting the varieties they will grow for the 2013-14 crop.

    As growers select their varieties, they should consider results of the UK Small Grain Variety Performance Test. In the 2012-13 growing season, 99 wheat varieties were evaluated in six locations across Kentucky, under both no-till and conventional tillage systems.

  • Impatiens downy mildew is widespread

    A new disease affecting a popular bedding and container plant will likely change the look of Kentucky gardens for years to come, said Nicole Ward Gauthier, extension plant pathologist for the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment.

    Impatiens downy mildew was first reported in the state in June 2012. It is widespread this growing season. Kentucky is not alone. The majority of states in the eastern half of the United States reported cases of the disease in 2012.

  • Farm News -July 31, 2013

    Conservation program for tornado damage

  • Pesticide container collection date is Aug. 7

    The LaRue County Plastic Pesticide Container Recycling Project will be conducted again this year. Commonly called Rinse and Return, the program provides a free, environmentally friendly way to dispose of used plastic pesticide containers.

    Local farmers and other users were encouraged to rinse the containers as they were used and store them until the collection date on Wednesday, Aug. 7. Other eligible plastic products can be recycled at the county’s recycling center.

    All recycled containers must be properly rinsed. Triple rinsing is suggested.

  • Check out Zinnia Fest on Groundhog Hill

    Sitting alone in a folding chair on a sunny afternoon in the middle of a babbling creek, a tired gardener’s mind tends to wander, and to wander, and then finally, to go blessedly blank.

    Then, the mind wanders some more before an image takes shape and solidifies: I sit on the edge of my truck tailgate smiling as friends mill about the garden laughing as they discover one flower more beautiful than the last. This isn’t Heaven. It’s Groundhog Hill.

    Ladies and Gentlemen, Zinnia Fest is upon us.

  • New mantra: Woulda, coulda, shoulda

    As I was mowing the garden the other day (that’s right, mowing — don’t judge.), the following thought occurred to me: This year’s garden at Groundhog Hill is both the prettiest and the ugliest garden I’ve ever tended.

    Beautiful zinnias planted in hedge-like rows. Check. Stately sunflowers about to bloom. Check. Johnson grass. Check.

    Rows of marigold overgrown with crabgrass. Check. Squash plants dying of wilt. Check. Rows of basil that never came up. Check.

    Pumpkin plants that still hold promise. Check.

  • Heat wave is affecting corn pollination

    Much of LaRue County’s corn crop is pollinating (or did pollinate) as daytime temperatures reached the highest for the season. According to the LaRue County Mesonet site, temperatures have peaked out in the upper 80s to low 90s for several days. This is causing some concern regarding pollination of corn during these high daytime temperatures.

  • Farm News -July 24, 2013

    Conservation program for tornado damage

  • Sisters pursue family farm in Hodgenville

    A trip down memory lane for Holly and Sierra Enlow is a ride in an old pickup truck along the bumpy dirt roads throughout their 800-acre Hodgenville farm.  

    A family tradition since 1901, the LaRue County property has been a lifelong refuge for the 20-something Enlow sisters, who remember long days in the fields with dad, playing in the creek and selling pumpkins from their pumpkin patch. Now grown and college educated, the two are hoping to plant their future in the same soil as their roots.