• Flight risk : bird sales grounded

    State Veterinarian Robert C. Stout has enacted restrictions on bird sales and movement in Kentucky to protect Kentucky’s poultry industry and bird population from the current avian influenza outbreak.

    “We are taking these steps out of an abundance of caution,” Dr. Stout said. “Poultry is Kentucky’s leading agricultural commodity, and we will do everything we can to keep our commercial and backyard poultry industries secure.”

    The Office of the State Veterinarian announced the following actions:

  • Blue mold in tobacco possible

    Blue mold in tobacco has been found in East Tenn-

    essee, and there is a possibility of spread into our area. It has been many years since blue mold has been a threat locally. Tobacco growers should take a proactive approach to the situation, and closely examine tobacco float beds and fields for signs of blue mold. Report any suspected activity to our office.

  • Bivens names to soybean promotion board

     Ryan Bivens, a soybean, corn and wheat farmer in Hodgenville, has been appointed to a two-year term on the Kentucky Soybean Promotion Board, which is the entity charged with investing Kentucky’s soybean checkoff dollars to create opportunities for increased profitability.

    Directors on this board serve as stewards of those funds, investing in production research, promoting animal agriculture, discovering and promoting new uses for soy-based products and keeping soybeans as a top-of-mind commodity with consumers.

  • Upcoming home canning classes

    When thinking about home canning, safety is of utmost importance. Bacteria, molds and yeast can grow quickly on fresh foods, and fruits and vegetables contain oxygen and enzymes that can cause food to spoil. Safe home canning methods help prevent the growth of these bacteria, yeast and molds in addition to removing excess oxygen from the food, which destroys spoilage enzymes and helps form strong vacuum seals on the jars.

  • Farmers hoping for resurgence of local farming by reinstating hemp

    rmers – Shelby Floyd from Upton and Matt Smith from Roanoke – are hoping for a resurgence of a strong local farming economy by area farmers reinstating hemp – a crop that hasn’t been grown here commercially for more than 60 years.

    Smith and Floyd, both 2011 LaRue County High School graduates, traveled to Colorado April 4 to the Northern Colorado Hemp Expo to learn more about the producing the plant commercially. They found that hemp is relatively easy to grow and quite versatile as it can be made into 25,000 products.

  • State opens comments on impaired waters list

    The Kentucky Division of Water has opened a 60-day comment period on the draft 2014 list of impaired waters, as required by the Water Pollution Control Act of 1972.

  • PHOTO: Ramona's first turkey

    Ramona Coffey, of Boston, harvested her first turkey April 20. The turkey weighed 20 pounds, and had 3/4-inch spurs and 11-inch beard. 

  • PHOTO: Brandon's tom

    Brandon Struck harvested a tom turkey May 2. The bird weighed 25.5 pounds with 1 1/2 inch Spurs and two beards measuring 12 inches and 7 1/4 inches.

  • PHOTO: Struck and jake

    Brandon Struck harvested a jake April 18. It weighed 19 pounds and had two beards measuring 5 1/2 inches and 5 inches.

  • PHOTO: Jared's harvest

    Jared Stillwell, Hodgenville, harvested a turkey April 5. It weighed 20 pounds and had a 10-inch beard.