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Agriculture

  • Red clover a good option for pasture

    Renovating pastures and hay fields to renew grass productivity is one of the most important things LaRue County farmers can do to improve the grassland grazing and hay land in the county. Pasture and other forage lands in LaRue County feed the county's 28,000 head of cattle and calves in addition to the other ruminant livestock and horses. Believe it or not, pasture renovation time will soon be here.

  • National Issues Forum to be held in Campbellsville

    The University of Kentucky’s Cooperative Extension Service will host a National Issues Forum 10 a.m. Feb. 7 in Campbellsville.

    NIF is a result of a partnership between the Kettering Foundation and the National Issues Forums Institute. The purpose is to use the comments from the Forums as a method to communicate and inform national policy makers. 

  • 74-year-old farmer puts out 6,000 pounds of leaf

    James Warren has been a part of burley tobacco farm production since before he was a teenager.

    Now, at 74 years old, he still raises 6,000 pounds of the leaf on his farm off Bennett Road, but he believes the tobacco companies will eventually snuff out small farm production in deference to the mega-crop producers, some of whom grow hundreds of thousands of pounds per year.

    “They’re docking us a nickel a bale when we sell our tobacco in small bales,” Warren said. “The bigger bales mean less labor at the receiving station.”

  • CAIP offers investment potential to farmers

    LaRue County has been allocated $135,000 for the County Agricultural Investment Program.  The program applicant is the LaRue County Beef Cattle Association and the grant administrator is Dyan Puckett.

    Producer grant applications will be accepted for a two-week period, Jan. 26-Feb. 9 at the LaRue County Cooperative Extension Service, 807 Old Elizabethtown Road in Hodgenville. The deadline for returning grant applications is 4:30 p.m.  Wednesday, Feb. 9. Office hours are 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

  • 4H Rabbit Club

    4-H Rabbit Club members participated in a Skillathon after the Dec. 28 meeting.  From left, Benjamin Lope, Holden Madriaga, Caitlin Aubrey, Sierra Mullins, Rachel Lope, Michaela Rock, Hallie Madriaga and Sarah Lope.

  • Deadline extended for CSP program

    The first ranking period sign up deadline for producers to submit their applications for NRCS’ 2011 Conservation Stewardship Program has been extended to Jan. 21.

    All producers are encouraged to apply for CSP. The program, authorized in the 2008 Farm Bill, offers payments to producers who maintain a high level of conservation on their land and who agree to adopt higher levels of stewardship. Eligible lands include cropland, pastureland, rangeland and nonindustrial forestland.

  • Hemlock Woolly Adelgid declared a public nuisance to Kentucky’s forests

    Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet Secretary Leonard K. Peters has issued a Declaration of Public Nuisance officially declaring the Hemlock Woolly Adelgid a public nuisance to Kentucky’s forests. The declaration not only directs the Kentucky Division of Forestry to protect and preserve forest resources from HWA infestations, it also provides the authority to seek and utilize public and private funds for projects associated with saving Kentucky’s hemlock trees. 

  • Essay and Poster Contest offered by Kentucky Proud

    Agriculture Commissioner Richie Farmer invites Kentucky students to explore the roles of Kentucky Proud and Kentucky agriculture in their everyday lives in the Kentucky Department of Agriculture’s annual Poster and Essay Contest.

  • Registration open for Master Cattlemen Program

    Beef producers in LaRue, Hardin and Meade counties have the opportunity again in 2011 to participate in the Heartland Master Cattlemen Program.   
    The Kentucky Master Cattlemen Program consists of 10, four-hour sessions focusing on beef production and the beef industry. These individual educational sessions cover management skills, forages, nutrition, facilities and animal behavior, environmental stewardship and industry awareness, genetics, reproduction, herd health, end product and marketing and profitability.  

  • Magnolia family featured on 'Faces of Farming'

    A Magnolia family will be featured on “Faces of Farming,” a program airing on Kentucky Educational Television in January.

    Howard Ragland, David Ragland and Caleb Ragland, three generations of farmers, are among six Kentucky families who talk about their agricultural lifestyle.

    Executive Producer Ray Bowman, a Franklin County goat producer and former state government spokesman, narrates the program.