.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Agriculture

  • High school greenhouse open to the public

    This year’s production in the LCHS Agri­science Greenhouse has been a huge success story. The season opening was April 18 and sales have been strong. The community traditionally has supported the efforts of local high school students by purchasing a vast array of bedding plants and a great selection of high quality hanging baskets in the area.

  • Farm Calendar: Updated May 4, 2011

    LaRue County Farmers Market
    LaRue County Farmers Market will open the season May 6. The market will be open 2-5:30 p.m. Tuesday and Friday at the LaRue County Extension service parking area.

    Beef Meeting

  • Pythium root rot in tobacco float beds

    Several diseases can affect tobacco seedlings in float beds.  These include anthracnose, blue mold, collar rot, pythium root rot, damping off (soreshin), blackleg, and target spot. Pythium root rot and target spot usually are the most common.  Let’s look at pythium root rot today.
    Pythium Root Rot can appear at any stage of transplant production, this disease normally appears when water temperatures consistently exceed 65 degrees. The first visible symptoms of Pythium root rot tend to be yellowing and stunting of transplants in a well-defined area or areas.

  • Fish and wildlife supports hunting sandhill cranes

    The Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources has come out in favor of limited hunting of the eastern population of the sandhill crane, which can be spotted in many areas of the county during migration through parts of Kentucky.
    John Brunjes, migratory bird biologist with the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife, wrote an article in support of limited hunting in response to opinion pieces opposing a proposal before the department that would allow limited harvest of the birds.

  • Flooding forces the hands of local farmers; tough decisions loom

    Flood waters bolstered by more than 20 inches of rain in a three week period are causing great concern for area farmers. The average rain fall per year for this area is 44 inches. Farmers in the area are now looking at options and making financial decisions, based on the fact that almost half of the year's precipitation fell in the month of April, putting planting of area crops behind schedule.

  • Brown harvests six bearded Tom turkey

    John Brown, of Hodgenville, harvested this unique Tom turkey on April 19. It weighed 23.72 pounds and had one-inch spurs. The bird has six beards and would be classified as a non-typical Tom. The total length of the beards measured 40.875 inches. Brown has harvested five double bearded birds and one triple bearded Tom in his hunting career, but this bird is a once in a lifetime trophy and is classified as very rare.
     

  • Farm News: Update April 26, 2011

    Farm Service Agency is relocating
    The Hardin/LaRue Farm Service Agency is moving to 250 Sportsman Lake Road, Elizabethtown, the week of April 25. The office will re-open May 2. Services will be extremely limited; call 765-2702 to ensure service has been restored.
    Garden Project
    LaRue County Community Action will hold its annual garden project 1 p.m. April 28. The program is income based and on a first-come, first-served basis. For more information, call Faith Miller at 358-3937.
     

  • 4-H Calendar: Updated April 26, 2011

    Register now for 4-H Camp
    4-H Camp will be June 28-July 1 at the Lake Cumberland 4-H Camp. Applications are available from the Extension Service office or www.ces.ca.uky.edu/larue/summercamp. It is open to LaRue County youth ages 9-14 and in grades 3-8. Cost for campers is $165. An $85 deposit will hold the child’s spot until May 20 when full payment is due. Scholarship applications are available for those with financial need. Space is limited for campers and adult and teen leaders. For more information, call 358-3401.

    Wranglers 4-H Horse Club

  • Success tips for cash hay operation

    As a follow up to last week’s column, let’s consider some additional tips to be profitable in hay production and marketing.
    Develop a plan to first harvest the heaviest production in a timely fashion. This first harvest can be nearly 50 percent of your annual yield on good stands in good years. Don’t let this opportunity pass you by.

  • Livestock barn exhibited fine carpentry craftsmanship

    This picture on the right, taken several years ago is of a once proud old livestock barn that was a perfect exhibition of the best of LaRue County sawed hardwood lumber and the best of carpentry craftsmanship. I saw this old barn years ago when, while it was deteriorating, what it once was, was easily visible. It is presently only a heap of rotted and rotting lumber.