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Agriculture

  • PHOTO: IFAL Conference

     LaRue County High School junior Turner Cottrell recently returned home from Kentucky Farm Bureau’s Institute for Future Agricultural Leaders. He and 45 other high school students from around the state attended the five-day summer leadership conference, held June 22-26 at the University of Kentucky. Cottrell, center, was greeted by Mark Haney, president of Kentucky Farm Bureau, left, and Dr. Larry Grabau, University of Kentucky Associate Dean for Instruction.

  • PHOTO: Ag interests

     Members of the 2014 Kentucky General Assembly Interim Joint Committee on Agriculture met with the members of the  Kentucky Soybean Association and the Kentucky Soybean Board last week at Ryan and Misty Bivens’ Fresh Start Farms in Hodgenville.

  • Tips for a field (or jar) full of fireflies

    Remember how much fun it was (or is) to chase fireflies when you were young? Once you caught a firefly, you would hold it in your hand to watch the flickering light for a few moments and then release it unharmed to fly away. You might also (as I did) make a firefly lantern with fireflies in a glass jar (holes punched in the lid of course).

  • Keep dreaded palmer amaranth at bay

    Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri) is another weed that LaRue County farmers will likely encounter before too long as it continues to march across Kentucky. Initially this weed was present primarily in the west end of the state, but has been reported (at least in a single field) in counties that border, or are near, LaRue County.

    These sightings would indicate that Palmer amaranth is a growing threat to grain crop production in LaRue County.

  • Garden a tapestry of birdsong and purple corn

    Keep on the sunny side, always on the sunny side.

    Keep on the sunny side of life.

    I awaken each morning around 5:30. I don’t use (or need) an alarm clock because I sleep with the windows open. The first sounds I hear each day are birdsong.

    You don’t get that natural harmonious chirping in the wee hours of Los Angeles unless you count the hum of police helicopter blades as they circle your neighborhood searching for yet another thief, bandit, or burglar.

    So, a big thumbs up to life in Hodgenville is birdsong.

  • It's optimal haymaking season

    Now is the optimal time for Kentucky forage producers to cut hay to ensure they get good quality and yield.

    “The stage of maturity at which the hay is cut is the biggest factor that affects quality,” said Tom Keene, UK hay marketing specialist with the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment.

  • Garden of Close Quarters mirrors family life

    I have seven older siblings. That’s right, seven. At times, they are all annoying and bossy ... and older.

    When we gather for meals around Dad’s kitchen table, it’s like squeezing sardines in a can. Close quarters.

    Speaking of close quarters, I planted two rows of Peruvian purple corn much too close to one another. Ditto, two rows of zinnia.

    I am fully aware of these quasi-planting errors.

  • Farm News - July 2

    Farmers Market offers more dates in July

    The LaRue County Farmers Market will be set up from noon to 6 p.m. July 3, 10, 17, 24 and 31, at 2533 Lincoln Farm Road, Hodgenville (beside Lincoln Jamboree). For more information, call the Extension office at 270-358-3401.

    State Fair entries

  • Take care when handling cattle in hot weather

    It is hot.

    Periods of heat stress call for cattle producers to make sure their animals are adequately prepared. One of the most important things producers can do is provide cool, clean drinking water. Providing an adequate source of drinking water helps to keep animals’ internal body temperatures within normal limits.

    Above ground water lines need to be shaded so they do not act as solar water heaters and make the water too hot to drink.

  • State Convention a success for LaRue County Future Farmers of America

    LaRue County FFA attended the 85th state convention. Several members were honored for contests held at region; others competed in state contests.

    The organization was recognized as a Gold Rated chapter and one of the top 15 chapters in the state. It now receives a National Rating.

    Six members received their state FFA degree – the highest degree awarded by the state to the organization. They are: Kyle DeVary, Kyle Edlin, Branden Pepper, Vickie Rhinehart, Sarah Stults and Austin Stillwell.

    Stillwell was a state officer candidate.