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Today's Features

  • During a board meeting in a small mountain church, one of the deacons said, “Preacher, I think we need a chandelier in the church.” Another deacon spoke up, “No, I’m against it. Nobody in the church can spell it. Nobody can play it. What we need in this church is more light.”

  • Jephthah, the son of a streetwalker, was born out of wedlock. Raised in a hostile, abusive environment, he eventually was thrown out of the house and became a rebel gang leader. But things changed when the Israelites needed a guy with guts to defeat the Ammonites. They told Jephthah, “Come. Be our chief … and you may become head over … Gilead” Judges 11:6-8. So, true to form, he led them to victory and became their leader. You can read his story in Judges, Chapter 11-12.

  • Ruth Astor of Buffalo had a dream of opening a restaurant in honor of her grandmother, Lora Wrolen, who not only loved to cook, but was extremely talented in her cooking.

    That dream came true on Feb. 6 when Astor opened her new carry-out restaurant, Wrolen Pin Cafe, located at 2533 Lincoln Farm Road, next door to Lincoln Jamboree.

    Astor’s mother, Brenda Miller from Lincoln Place, Ill., her daughters, Sarah Beth and Rebekah and a friend, Ernest Baker, are helping with the grand opening.

  • Producer applications for the LaRue County Goat and Sheep Association’s Goat and Sheep Diversification Program will be accepted Jan. 5-30. Approved applicants must submit receipts for reimbursement of qualified expenses before Jan. 30. The program’s grant funds are a portion of the Phase 1 Tobacco Program. Applications and further information including guidelines and restrictions may be obtained by contacting program administrators Sherman and Renee Thomason at 358-0187, Gil Myers at 324-4366 or the LaRue County Extension Service office at 358-3401. 

  • A Scottsville couple have been named winner of Kentucky Farm Bureau’s annual Outstanding Young Farm Family contest.

    Bart and Sarah Jones received the first-place award last week at Farm Bureau’s annual meeting at the Galt House Hotel.

  • Twenty-eight farmers from the Hardin and LaRue County area met with Farm Market Analyst Jason Moss to review and discuss the new farm environment and how producers will need to compete in the 21st century.

    Moss – part of the nationally known Brock Report Team – delivered the message that the U.S. farm economy has undergone profound changes over the last few months with rising commodity prices, roller coaster economics and adjustments in hedging and margins, bringing a whole new set of risks to farming.

  • Twenty-eight farmers from the Hardin and LaRue County area met with Farm Market Analyst Jason Moss to review and discuss the new farm environment and how producers will need to compete in the 21st century.

    Moss – part of the nationally known Brock Report Team – delivered the message that the U.S. farm economy has undergone profound changes over the last few months with rising commodity prices, roller coaster economics and adjustments in hedging and margins, bringing a whole new set of risks to farming.

  • Twenty-eight farmers from the Hardin and LaRue County area met with Farm Market Analyst Jason Moss to review and discuss the new farm environment and how producers will need to compete in the 21st century.

    Moss – part of the nationally known Brock Report Team – delivered the message that the U.S. farm economy has undergone profound changes over the last few months with rising commodity prices, roller coaster economics and adjustments in hedging and margins, bringing a whole new set of risks to farming.

  • When Dr. Khue Tran leaves his Hodgenville medical practice Jan. 30, he hopes to find a little more time for himself and family outside the office.

    After being accustomed to 12- to 16-hour workdays year after year, the 60-year-old physician who lives in Elizabethtown, feels the time has come to reduce his workload.

    “When I was younger, I could be awakened in the middle of the night and be able to go right back to sleep, but each year that gets a little harder,” he said. He intends to carry a slimmer schedule while practicing at Fort Knox.

  • A pair of telephone scams that appear to target the elderly are being investigated by the LaRue County Sheriff’s Office.

    The sheriff’s office received a complaint from the daughter of an elderly woman who resides in a nursing home last week, according to Deputy Russell McCoy.

    A person claiming to be associated with a lending agency requested checking account information for the mother. The caller knew a small amount of personal information already. The originating number was either blocked or showed “unknown” on the daughter’s caller ID.