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Today's Features

  • Eight seconds can seem like a lifetime to a rider hanging on with only a rope and a prayer as an 1,100-pound, very agitated bucking horse tries everything in its bag of tricks to heave the unwelcome load off its back.

    “It’s a challenge, definitely, but that’s why I love it, and that’s why it’s fun,” said Cody Stephens, a senior at LaRue County High School who is the defending state high school rodeo champ in bareback bronc riding.

  • Weather conditions seem to be changing to a warmer pattern. These conditions can lead to a number of environmental disorders such as damping off in tobacco float beds.

    The float-system environment is near-ideal for Rhizoctonia solani, the fungus causing damping-off (or soreshin) in tobacco seedlings. Damping-off usually occurs early in the development of the seedling and first appears as a water-soaked lesion at the base of the plant.

  • The LaRue County Farmer’s Market will open May 7 in the LaRue County Extension Service parking lot. It will be open 2-5 p.m. on Thursdays.

    If you are interested in becoming a member of the market, there is a $15 fee for the year due by May 7. Non-members will be charged a $10 set-up fee for each market day you set up. Contact Abby Tate, Food and Nutrition assistant at the Extension Office for more information at 358-3401. The farmer’s market is primarily for the benefit of local producers and to give local consumers access to the freshest products.

  • LaRue County Farm Bureau is offering $3,000 in college scholarships. These include four $500 college scholarships open to both high school seniors who will enter college this fall, to undergraduate college students, and to adults interested in entering college or continuing their college education.

    LaRue County Farm Bureau also will offer a $1,000 scholarship in memory of Ben H. Crawford Jr. Applicants for this scholarship must be a college sophomore or higher, including graduate students, pursuing a degree in agriculture or an agriculture-related field.

  • Carwash

    Boy Scout Troop 151 will have a car wash at 9 a.m. May 9 in the parking lot of LaRue County Farm Bureau. Donations are appreciated.

    Cornhole for Relay

    Relay for Life will host a cornhole tournament 10 a.m. May 9 in the Abraham Lincoln Elementary School gym; $10 per person. For more information, call 766-7834.

    Project Graduation bake sale

    Project Graduation will hold a bake sale 9 a.m. May 9 in the IGA lobby. For more information, call 358-4375.

  • USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service is accepting applications for the Wildlife Habitat Incentives Program signup. Landowners may apply for WHIP at any time however; applications received by April 15 will be evaluated and considered for the 2009 program year. Applications received after that date will be held until the next evaluation period.

  • Excessive winter annual weed growth can affect insect management in corn. One insect group problem that may be encountered is the cutworms. Cutworms do not prefer to lay eggs on corn, they more commonly lay their eggs on winter annual weeds. Black cutworm cannot overwinter here; in early spring the moths migrate to Kentucky with weather fronts out of the south. As the moths tend to lay their eggs and feed on winter annuals, cutworm damage usually occurs when winter annuals have been burnt down with herbicides forcing the intermediate-stage larvae to feed on the emerging corn.

  • Farm tractors and farm equipment can be dangerous. Each year there are accidents with farm equipment that causes injuries and death.

  • The Street, Elizabethtown Community and Technical College’s student newspaper, won 24 awards at the Kentucky Intercollegiate Press Association annual conference at Western Kentucky University Feb. 28. Seven were first place in their categories.

  • After a three-year wait, the LaRue County Genealogy Society has found a home.

    The historical research group will move to the Hodgenville City Police station on North Greensburg Street after the first of the year – just as soon as the police have relocated to another building. The new police station will be in the educational building formerly owned by First Baptist Church on West High Street.

    Last week, members of the historical society met with Hodgenville Mayor Terry Cruse to hear his plans for accommodations for the group.