.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Features

  • The Heartland Review, the literary publication published by Elizabethtown Community and Technical College, is offering a poetry contest for area residents.

    First place in the Ruth Redel Poetry Contest is $200 and publication in The Heartland Review Fall 2009 issue.

    THR asks for a $3 tax-deductible contribution for each poem to support the contest and journal. Make checks out to The Heartland Review. Send a cover page with contact information and titles of poems name, address, and a short biography (40 words maximum).

  • “The Faces of Cancer,” a special photo exhibit, was unveiled at a cancer survivor celebration, “Hope Soars … Celebrating Life” June 28 at My Old Kentucky Home State Park. The exhibit features survivors from LaRue, Breckinridge, Grayson, Hardin, Marion, Meade, Nelson and Washington counties. Two Hodgenville residents, Sue Young and Ramona Coffey, are survivors portrayed on the exhibit. The exhibit, donated by Lakeview Photography in Bardstown, will travel the eight-county region, stopping first at Flaget Memorial Hospital.

  • Why is open kettle canning not recommended?

    In open kettle canning, food is cooked in an ordinary kettle, then packed into hot jars and sealed without processing. The temperatures obtained in open kettle canning are not high enough to destroy all spoilage and food poisoning organisms that may be in the food. Also, microorganisms can enter the food when it is transferred from the kettle to jar and cause spoilage.

  • Celia Creal McDonald has been named manager for Hodgenville’s Main Street/Renaissance Association. She has held the position on an interim basis since January.

    McDonald is a native of Hodgenville and has lived here all her life except for a 19-year absence when she resided in Danville, Lexington and Louisville. She and her husband, Bob, returned to Hodgenville to take over The LaRue County Herald News after the death of her father in 1978 and later served as a founder, president and executive director of the LaRue County Arts Council.

  • As I stood at the church door greeting people Sunday, I received a phone call that my nephew in Augusta, Ga., was found dead. What a shock!

    We buried his mother (my sister) less than three months ago. His father has advanced Parkinson’s disease and the three of them lived together, with my nephew caring for his father and mother. His father has been sick for a long time, so no one would have predicted that my sister and my nephew would have died first.

  • The 2009 LaRue County Fair will be July 23-Aug. 1 and county residents are encouraged to enter crop and livestock exhibits. Agriculture remains a strong part of our 102nd LaRue County Community Fair.

    Specific details for all the events can be reviewed in the 2009 LaRue County Community Fair supplement in The LaRue County Herald News. The catalog should be consulted to help you meet the rules and regulations. 

  • Chief Justice of Kentucky John D. Minton Jr. has appointed a judge who serves Hart and LaRue counties to a regional post. District Court Judge C. Derek Reed has been appointed as vice chief regional district judge for the Green River Region. On the District Court level, the region consists of Allen, Barren, Breckinridge, Bullitt, Butler, Daviess, Edmonson, Grayson, Hancock, Hardin, Hart, LaRue, Logan, Meade, Metcalfe, Ohio, Simpson, Todd and Warren counties.

    Reed is one of the 30 judges Chief Justice Minton named to regional posts across Kentucky.

  • Sixty-five Community Early Childhood Councils have been funded through KIDS NOW Tobacco Settlement money. LaRue County’s program received $14,250.  

    CECCs are comprised of community partners who promote high-quality early care and education at the local level.

     

  • Joe Pearman and Sons are in the process of building their first above-ground storm shelter for a homeowner near Buffalo.

    Linda Riley said her Greensburg Road home does not have a basement and she found the above-ground shelter to be a great alternative to digging under the house.

    Pearman said the shelter is rated to withstand an F5 tornado. The shelter is 6 feet, 8 inches by 5 feet with 8-inch thick walls. The ceiling is constructed with concrete reinforced with steel rods from top to bottom. The footer goes down about 40 inches.

  • The LaRue County Plastic Pesticide Container Recycling Project will be conducted again this growing season with a few changes. Commonly called Rinse and Return, the program provides a free, environmentally friendly way to dispose of used plastic pesticide containers. Local farmers and other users are encouraged to rinse the containers as they are used and store them until the collection date Aug. 5. There is only one date this year. Other eligible plastic products can be recycled at the county’s recycling center.