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Today's Features

  • Campbellsville University plans to open a satellite campus in Hodgenville later this year.

    John Chowning, CU’s vice president for church and external relations, said representatives of the four-year Christian institution have “been in conversations with local leaders about offering post secondary classes” for several weeks.

    Classes will be held in the former Farm Service Agency building on Old E’town Road, which was donated to the college by Paul Hilpp, a general contractor from Lebanon.

  • Andy, the K-9 officer of the LaRue County Sheriff’s Department, is now a nationally certified drug dog.

    Andy and his handler, Deputy Russell McCoy, attended a day-long session in Murfreesboro last week. The 3-year-old Belgian Malinois did a “great” job at locating the different kinds of drugs hidden at the training center, McCoy said.

    Although Andy has worked numerous drug cases in LaRue and surrounding counties, his designation as a “National Narcotics Detective Dog” gives his nose for drugs more credence in matters of search and seizure.

  • Residents have the chance to make a one-of-a-kind Lincoln Bicentennial souvenir when a nationally known basket weaver holds classes in Hodgenville next month.

    Martha Wetherbee, an expert in the design, creation and history of Shaker baskets, will provide materials and instruction in creation of the "Lincoln Bicentennial Penny Basket," honoring the 200th anniversary of the birth of native son Abraham Lincoln.

    The penny basket will be 4 1/2-inches in diameter and can be made in one day.

  • One of LaRue County’s oldest cemeteries sits atop a small hill in Leafdale, shaded by ancient oaks and overgrown with poison ivy and saw briars.

    Little Mount Cemetery hasn’t had a burial since 70-year-old Kate Friend died in 1916. But most of the 90-or-so tombstones are inscribed with dates from the mid-1800s. Among the dead are Civil War soldiers, a playmate of Sarah Lincoln, a traveling salesman and the first sheriff of LaRue County.

  • Congratulations LaRue County and City of Hodgenville residents.

    After completing our annual report required by the state of Kentucky, we have reduced our trash going to the landfill by 1,000 tons. That’s a lot of trash.

    How did this happen?

    1) Our recycling has increased “yippee” and more of us are becoming more responsible and looking at ways to reduce cost and increase recycling of nearly everything.

  • Teen shutterbugs gathered in the LaRue County High School art room for a week of intense training and fun starting June 15.

    Teacher Monique Hanna provided photography and ceramics instruction.

  • Recently it was my honor to bring the first graduation address for the Leitchfield Christian Academy, which was founded during my ministry there. My message began with some remarks from the late Sir Winston Churchill made some years ago at a Yale commencement where he followed a Yale alumnus who was receiving an honorary degree. The alumnus had elaborated extensively about the university with each letter of “YALE” a point in his speech.

  • “It’s not right to take bread … and throw it to dogs.” Matthew 15:26

    Desperation puts us in situations where we’ve nothing to lose. When our pain level gets high enough, we’ll do whatever it takes to find relief.

  • Rabbit Club

    The 4-H Rabbit Club will meet 3:30-5 p.m. June 8 at the LaRue County Extension Service office.

    4-H camp registration

    4-H camp registration is under way for LaRue County youth ages 9-13. Camp will be June 29-July 2 at Lake Cumberland. Registration forms are available at the Extension Service office. Cost is $140 per camper. A $75 deposit is due with registration form to hold the child’s spot. Full payment is due by May 22.

     

     

  • The LaRue County Agricultural Development Council has been rescheduled for June 16 at 7:30 p.m. at the LaRue County Extension Office.