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Today's Features

  • After a school break, your family may have a hard time getting back into a regular sleep routine. Research indicates that there is a relationship between getting the recommended amount of sleep and maintaining a healthy weight.  Children need to have 10 to 11 hours of sleep each day while adults need seven to eight. Sleep gives the body time to fight off sickness and infection. If you or your children have a hard time getting to sleep try:

    ·Exercising during the day. Stop exercise three hours before you plan to go to sleep. 

  • “But he was a leper.” 2 Kings 5:1

    Take a moment and read II Kings, Chapter 5. Naaman was an extraordinary leader but his impressive armor hid a bad condition: “But he was a leper?”

    The odds may all be in your favor, you’ve graduated from the best university, built a big church or made company CEO. Yet before you can qualify for the next level of blessings, God will force you to deal with the infection beneath the armor.

  • Free car wash

    The youth of Buffalo Baptist Church will have a free car wash 9 a.m.-noon May 16. Donations will be accepted. All proceeds will go toward the summer mission trip. Call 325-3820 for more information.

  • LaRue County 4-H members excelled April 18 in Washington County at the Area 4-H Variety Show. As a group, the participants won three grand champion honors and one reserve champion award.

    The members first competed at the LaRue County 4-H Talent Show. The winning acts at the county level then advanced to compete at the Area 4-H Variety Show. The acts are divided into two age groups: juniors ages 9-14 and seniors ages 14-18. The acts are divided by category. The categories include vocal, instrumental, physical skills and theatrical.     

  • In her 36 years as administrator of Sunrise Manor Nursing Home in Hodgenville, Daphne Loyall has experienced her share of emergencies.

    The late January ice storm that knocked out electric power to her home on Salem Church Road for 10 days, however, put her in the role of saving an unusual potential victim – the family’s 11-foot-long, 25-pound red-tail boa constrictor.

    The boa was a gift to her son Zach about 12 years ago. At that time, it was only about one foot long.

  • Seventeen-year-old Stephen McKellep hopes to join the ranks of Bill Gates, Neil Armstrong, H. Ross Perot and Gerald R. Ford by summer. He’s working on his Eagle Scout Badge through the Boy Scouts of America. It’s the highest honor awarded in scouting.

    McKellep, the son of David and Marsha McKellep of Upton, has planned a two-day electronics recycling or “eCycling” event with the assistance of Hodgenville’s Renaissance Recycling Center.

  • There are several burley tobacco seedling diseases caused by fungi and fungus-like organisms. Let’s look at them.

  • Eight seconds can seem like a lifetime to a rider hanging on with only a rope and a prayer as an 1,100-pound, very agitated bucking horse tries everything in its bag of tricks to heave the unwelcome load off its back.

    “It’s a challenge, definitely, but that’s why I love it, and that’s why it’s fun,” said Cody Stephens, a senior at LaRue County High School who is the defending state high school rodeo champ in bareback bronc riding.

  • Weather conditions seem to be changing to a warmer pattern. These conditions can lead to a number of environmental disorders such as damping off in tobacco float beds.

    The float-system environment is near-ideal for Rhizoctonia solani, the fungus causing damping-off (or soreshin) in tobacco seedlings. Damping-off usually occurs early in the development of the seedling and first appears as a water-soaked lesion at the base of the plant.

  • The LaRue County Farmer’s Market will open May 7 in the LaRue County Extension Service parking lot. It will be open 2-5 p.m. on Thursdays.

    If you are interested in becoming a member of the market, there is a $15 fee for the year due by May 7. Non-members will be charged a $10 set-up fee for each market day you set up. Contact Abby Tate, Food and Nutrition assistant at the Extension Office for more information at 358-3401. The farmer’s market is primarily for the benefit of local producers and to give local consumers access to the freshest products.