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Today's Features

  • The Legal Aid Society, 416 W. Muhammad Ali Blvd., Louisville, will hold free legal clinics.

    A reservation for each clinic is required. Contact the Legal Aid Society at (502) 584-1254 to make your reservation. 

    •Bankruptcy Seminar – 2 p.m. Jan. 21. An attorney from the private bar will be present to answer questions about bankruptcy.

  • In the last couple of years, our area has seen a new wellness beverage being marketed here. This type of item would be considered a dietary supplement.

    You should remember that the FDA regulates dietary supplements under a different set of regulations than those covering “conventional” foods and drug products. Under the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994, the manufacturer is responsible for ensuring that a dietary supplement is safe before it is marketed.

  • Louisville’s Farmington Historic Plantation will host a lecture Feb. 6 called “Louisville’s Lincoln: How Local Influences Altered Lincoln’s Presidency and American History.” The lecture will be given by historian Steve Wiser.

    The program, which will take place at the Farmington Visitor Center, is $10 per person. Tickets can be purchased in advance by calling 452-9920, or at the door.  Coffee and light refreshments will be served.

  • There is a lot of information about exercise available. It can be found on TV, in magazines or newspapers, on the Internet and even on the radio. With so much information out there, it can sometimes be hard to tell the fact from the fiction.

    Here are 10 common exercise myths and why they are not true:

  • LaRue County Health Department

    According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, about 7,500 lives have been saved by the proper use of child restraints during the past 20 years. Yet, motor vehicle crashes still remain the number one killer of children ages 4 to 14 in America. The reason? Too often it is the improper use or non-use of child safety seats and booster seats.

  • A few hundred feet down Hall-Gaddie Road, about a mile south of Lincoln Farm, is an attention-getting sign nailed onto a utility pole.

    “Welcome to Gaddieville. Bobbie Gaddie, Mayor,” the sign states.

    Although the “town” isn’t officially incorporated, the residents certainly have a legitimate claim to it, for the Gaddie family has owned that land through four generations, more than 100 years.

  • The small puppy, cupped in the hands of Taylor County Animal Shelter Director John Harris, looks around at his new home. In the background, a chorus of barks erupts and the puppy’s ears perk up.

    He may have a new home, but he’s not alone. This animal shelter is full.

    And, according to Harris, the shelter is applying for grant funding to expand for a third time.

  • Baseball cards, stamps, coins and even rocks have helped create extensive collections for many people. However, there are few collections that can be truly meaningful for an entire community like the recent find by Carl Howell, Hodgenville attorney and Lincoln historian.

    Howell’s grandfather built the Nancy Lincoln Inn near the Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historic Park and helped him develop his love for history, specifically for Abraham Lincoln. Now, he excitedly shares the news of his latest discovery with hopes that it will inspire interest and further research.

  • A Hodgenville funeral home is under new management after the retirement of a long-time employee.

    Billy Howell, director of Billy Howell Funeral Chapel on Lincoln Boulevard, retired in October after an extended illness. He now is living with relatives.

    Rondal Wright, who has owned the funeral home nine years, began looking for a new manager. He turned to Ron Rust, a Lyons Station native who owned funeral homes in New Haven and Boston and is a close friend of Howell.

  • Most of us contemplate what God is thinking when he allows bizarre or terrible things to happen in our lives. Why does such a loving God allow homes, relationships and even families to be broken? 

    Rusty Wilson, youth minister at Union Christian Church, addresses those questions in his upcoming album titled, “I’ll make It Heaven.” This Christian centered, 11-track album talks about relationships – friendships, romantic relationships, families and ultimately our relationship with Christ.