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Today's Features

  • The play “Ain’t No Massa Ova Me” will be performed 4 p.m. Oct. 3 at the Hodgenville Civic Center, 200 S. Lincoln Blvd. Tickets are $10.

    The musical drama revolves around two sisters who suffered many hardships but fought to escape slavery in war torn Kentucky – and the impact of Abraham Lincoln signing the Emancipation Proclamation.

    Call 502-409-1716 for more information.

  • First Baptist Hodgenville was host to the South District Youth March for Christ on Saturday morning. The South District is composed of nine counties including Boyle, Washington and Lincoln counties.

    Eight churches were represented with about 80 people attending. Each church represented had banners and shirts with their logo.

    Hodgenville Mayor Terry Cruse delivered greetings from the city. There were individual classes for primary, intermediate and adults.

  • Signups for the Conservation Stewardship Program will be accepted through Wednesday, Sept. 30. CSP is a voluntary program that encourages agricultural and forestry producers to maintain existing conservation activities and adopt additional ones on their operations.

    Unlike the Conservation Security Program under the 2002 Farm Bill, which was available only in designated watersheds, CSP is available statewide.

  • Merrill Kurtz IV is the new associate pastor for children and family ministries at Ovesen Heights Baptist Church.

    He is a graduate of Boyce Bible School and is attending Southern Seminary in Louisville.

    His responsibilities include developing programs to minister to children and families as well as fill the pulpit as needed.

    He and his wife, Lora, and their son, Joseph, reside in Elizabethtown.

  • The 4-H program in Kentucky turns 100 this year.

    Since its inception in 1909, it has provided countless programs for youth. The earliest offerings were in agriculture, but more activities were added over the years including photography, communication, leadership, shooting skills and dog clubs.

    By 1939, 4-H programs existed in every county in Kentucky. Last year, 233,423 children participated in 129 different 4-H programs, projects and camps.

  • Class of 1964

    The LCHS Class of 1964 will celebrate its 45-year reunion with a meal and program 6 p.m. Oct. 2 at LaRue County Middle School cafeteria. For more information, contact Janis Warren Rogers, Beverly Russell Heady, Betty Crawford, Hazle Ragland Hinton, Mickey Miller, Ronnie Benningfield or call 358-9614.

    LCHS Class of 1999

  • If the Bible were destroyed and only John 3:16 remained that would be enough to bring the whole world to salvation. We do not have to be a walking encyclopedia to be saved. When we understand and experience John 3:16 we have a passport to Heaven.

    The cause of salvation is found in the words, “For God so loved the world ...” (John 3:16). Salvation does not begin in the life of man, but in the love of God. God’s love goes beyond all other love. Salvation is rooted and grounded in the love of God.

  • The 4-H year runs Sept. 1 through Aug. 31. It’s now time for 4-H members to submit their 4-H Awards Point System Record Sheets.

    Record Sheets are simply a record of the 4-H activities or events a particular member has participated in during the past year. Points are assigned for various events, depending on the level of participation. Members then submit a record of the points they have earned, in order to be eligible for 4-H Points Awards to be presented Dec. 7 at the annual 4-H Awards Banquet.

  • LaRue County’s grain producers soon will begin an expected bountiful harvest of corn. With these higher yields, it is critical to fine-tune equipment to reduce field loss, reduce mechanical delays, improve performance, assure a safe harvest and maintain grain quality of your crops. In fact, a few hours spent with combines, augers, conveyors, dryers and storage bins usually will have a considerable pay back. 

  • According to the 2007 USDA Agricultural census, LaRue County ranks sixth in goat production and about 25th in sheep production in the state. While sheep numbers have declined for several years, goat production has done just the opposite – numbers have increased significantly.

    Much of the increase in goat numbers has been the introduction of meat type goats such as Boer goats from Africa and other foreign countries. This has generated an increased supply of higher quality goat meat for consumers.