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Today's Features

  • The 4-H program in Kentucky turns 100 this year.

    Since its inception in 1909, it has provided countless programs for youth. The earliest offerings were in agriculture, but more activities were added over the years including photography, communication, leadership, shooting skills and dog clubs.

    By 1939, 4-H programs existed in every county in Kentucky. Last year, 233,423 children participated in 129 different 4-H programs, projects and camps.

  • Class of 1964

    The LCHS Class of 1964 will celebrate its 45-year reunion with a meal and program 6 p.m. Oct. 2 at LaRue County Middle School cafeteria. For more information, contact Janis Warren Rogers, Beverly Russell Heady, Betty Crawford, Hazle Ragland Hinton, Mickey Miller, Ronnie Benningfield or call 358-9614.

    LCHS Class of 1999

  • If the Bible were destroyed and only John 3:16 remained that would be enough to bring the whole world to salvation. We do not have to be a walking encyclopedia to be saved. When we understand and experience John 3:16 we have a passport to Heaven.

    The cause of salvation is found in the words, “For God so loved the world ...” (John 3:16). Salvation does not begin in the life of man, but in the love of God. God’s love goes beyond all other love. Salvation is rooted and grounded in the love of God.

  • The 4-H year runs Sept. 1 through Aug. 31. It’s now time for 4-H members to submit their 4-H Awards Point System Record Sheets.

    Record Sheets are simply a record of the 4-H activities or events a particular member has participated in during the past year. Points are assigned for various events, depending on the level of participation. Members then submit a record of the points they have earned, in order to be eligible for 4-H Points Awards to be presented Dec. 7 at the annual 4-H Awards Banquet.

  • LaRue County’s grain producers soon will begin an expected bountiful harvest of corn. With these higher yields, it is critical to fine-tune equipment to reduce field loss, reduce mechanical delays, improve performance, assure a safe harvest and maintain grain quality of your crops. In fact, a few hours spent with combines, augers, conveyors, dryers and storage bins usually will have a considerable pay back. 

  • According to the 2007 USDA Agricultural census, LaRue County ranks sixth in goat production and about 25th in sheep production in the state. While sheep numbers have declined for several years, goat production has done just the opposite – numbers have increased significantly.

    Much of the increase in goat numbers has been the introduction of meat type goats such as Boer goats from Africa and other foreign countries. This has generated an increased supply of higher quality goat meat for consumers.

  • Mrs. Smith’s and Mrs. Cline’s fourth-grade classes met for their 4-H meeting Sept. 16 at Abraham Lincoln Elementary School. 

    The meeting was held by Misty Wilmoth, 4-H Agent. 4-H membership forms were sent home by Mrs. Wilmoth for parents to fill out and return. Jada Montgomery led the 4-H pledge. Mrs. Wilmoth talked to everyone about what 4-H was.

  • The LaRue County FFA Chapter was selected as a 3-Star winner in the National FFA Chapter Award program. The local organization was selected from a pool of more than 600 candidates nationwide.

    “It is very exciting to know that our chapter is recognized as one of the elite chapters, not only in Kentucky, but in the nation,” said FFA advisor and LaRue County High School agriculture teacher Misty Bivens. “Mr. (Tim) Quiggins and I know that our members are outstanding, but it’s good to know it is recognized by others also.”

  • The Legal Aid Society will have free legal clinics in September and October. Each clinic will be held at 416 W. Muhammad Ali Blvd., Louisville. Reservations is required by calling (502) 584-1254.

    Foreclosure Clinic – 11 a.m. Sept. 22; 6 p.m. Sept. 24; 11 a.m. Sept. 29; 6 p.m. Oct. 1; 11 a.m. Oct. 6; 6 p.m. Oct. 8; 11 a.m. Oct. 13; 6 p.m. Oct. 15; 11 a.m. Oct. 20; 6 p.m. Oct. 22; 11 a.m. Oct. 27; 6 p.m. Oct. 29; attorneys will be on hand to answer questions about foreclosures and provide advice on alternatives to foreclosure.

  • The Hodgenville Main Street/Renaissance Association will hold a dinner and concert event Sept. 26 at the Hodgenville Civic Center. Water’s Edge will appear in concert following the dinner.

    Water’s Edge “music ranges from gospel to jazz and even Elvis may make an appearance,” according to Main Street Director Celia McDonald.

    The performers are tenor Dan Blanchard; Stu Sollman, lead; Tim Shaner, baritone; and Tim Blanchard, bass and vocal percussionist as well as arranger/writer for the group. All are from Louisville.