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Today's Features

  • Our young people are the future leaders and decision makers of the nation. 4-H offers youth a prime opportunity to explore and engage in leadership roles. By participating in a leadership role in organizations like 4-H, young people have the opportunity to develop critical thinking, communication and life skills that will aid them in making crucial future decisions.

    Many leadership experiences are geared toward older youth, but younger youth also have the opportunity to become leaders early in their 4-H career.

  • Senior Citizens music

    The Senior Citizens Center, 112 N. Walters Ave., Hodgenville, has music 6:30 p.m. every Saturday. Musicians and singers are welcome. For more information, call 358-4311 or e-mail viola47@ windstream.net.

    Daily events

    The Senior Citizens Center, 112 N. Walters Ave., Hodgenville has walking, exercise Skipbo and sewing each Monday; bingo each Wednesday and Friday; and line dancing and chair massages each Thursday. For more information, call Katie Carter at 358-4235.

  • The Kentucky Alfalfa Conference will be 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Feb. 25 at the Cave City Convention Center. Topics include advances in alfalfa seed, the value of crop rotations, alfalfa hay for horses, alfalfa baleage, grazing alfalfa, varieties for the future, alfalfa for wildlife and production and marketing. The conference will have its largest-ever silent auction. An awards program is also on the agenda.

    Preregistration is not necessary. The cost to attend is $15 for adults and $5 for students. Certified Crop Adviser credits are available.

  • As LaRue County beef producers consider buying bulls they should think about their overall breeding program. It is important to assess what traits are going to have the greatest economic impact in your management system and target a bull to give the production level that you need. If you are in the commercial cattle business and you have been using the same breed of bull for several years then you should probably consider adopting a crossbreeding program.

  • The increased costs of seed, fertilizer, fuel and land rents have caused many farmers to consider cutting costs in corn production, however, it is also a good time to review the concepts of producing high yields.

  • Because we want our children to have beautiful healthy smiles for a lifetime, start early to ensure their future dental health. The following tips and guidelines will put your children on the path to a lifetime of healthy habits.

  • Lincoln Trail Career Centers encourage dislocated and unemployed workers in LaRue County to register for short-term training opportunities. Financial assistance is available for LaRue County residents who qualify. The Centers work with local agencies, learning centers and universities to provide affordable education for people wishing to boost their current skills or re-train for a new career. Partners include the Department for Adult Education and Literacy, the Office of Employment and Training, Kentucky Community and Technical Colleges and St. Catharine College.

  • In 2005, about 8.9 percent of Kentucky’s adult population had been diagnosed with diabetes. Diabetes is the number one cause of disability for Kentuckians and the fifth leading cause of death by disease. Among the 50 states, Kentucky ranks seventh for having the highest number in the adult population diagnosed with diabetes.

    The cost of diabetes in both life and medical care is alarming. In 2002 about 2.9 billion dollars was spent on treating diabetes in Kentucky. Preventing this catastrophic disease is a priority.

  • Lincoln Trail District Health Department will provide training sessions to review changes to Kentucky’s Food Code in Grayson, Hardin, LaRue, Marion, Meade, Nelson and Washington counties. The target audience will include facilities holding food permits.

    “We want to make sure all of the restaurants, grocers, and food suppliers in our area understand the changes to the state’s food code before they take effect," said Sara Jo Best, environmental director at Lincoln Trail District Health Department.

  • Veterans Upward Bound at Western Kentucky University is accepting applications from veterans to attend its free educational program.

    VUB is a federal program, funded by the U.S. Department of Education, to help U.S. military veterans enter into and succeed in postsecondary school. It is a non-profit, free of charge program serving veterans from the Bowling Green area along with 11 surrounding counties.