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Today's Features

  • Since June 28, the Rev. Andrew Singh has done what many itinerant preachers of old did — pastor two churches concurrently.

     “A lot of those itinerant pastors traveled on horseback,” said the 25-year-old minister from India. “I’m so glad that I have a car.”

    Pastor of Wesley Meadows Methodist Church since 2004, Singh sees the addition of Levelwoods Methodist Church as an opportunity and a blessing.

    “God has expanded my ministry, allowing me to meet, serve, and be blessed by another group of people,” he explained.

  • Snookie Morrison and Santa’s Helpers are again planning to make Christmas brighter for local children.

    The group – in its 43rd year – is requesting donations of new and used toys that can be refurbished.

    Trees with gift tags are set up at the LaRue County Chamber of Commerce office and Abe’s Coun­try Cooking. Take a tag, buy the toy and bring it back to the tree.

    Toys also may be dropped in the Santa’s Helper box at IGA, Dollar General Store and Lincoln National Bank or at Santa’s Shop, 760 Salem Lake Road, Hodgenville.

  • The South Fork Area Homemakers met Nov. 17 at the LaRue County Extension Service office with vice president Billie Shahayda presiding.

    Present were Virginia Allen, Delores Bale, Janice Bowen, Ann Flanders, Amanda Gatewood, Mary Lois Hornback, Norma Jean McDonald, Martha Owen, Mary Lou Owen, Della Thomas, Phyllis Perkins and Exie Elliott.

    A letter was read from the Cumberland Presbyterian Church Mission Project thanking the club for voting to be a sponsor of the Community Food Pantry Program.

    The group discussed catering a meal for the Class of 1960.

  • The local Community Action office is assisting low-income families with heating bills with funding provided by LIHEAP or the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program.

    Applicants are accepted in alphabetically by the first letter of their last name and will be taken Nov. 2-Dec. 11. Financial qualifications are based on the number of household occupants and the gross monthly income of all family members.

    To qualify, the homeowner or renter must be responsible for home heating costs or pay heating costs as an undesignated portion of rent.

  • A pair of business owners are starting a book discussion group.

    Becky Harrison of Lincolns Loft already has organized one book club that meets at the Lincoln Square bookstore at 5:30 p.m. Thursdays. The group discussed “Under the Banner of Heaven,” a true story about a Mor­mon murderer, by Jon Krakauer on Oct. 16.

    Harrison and Gale Schmittou of Cozy Café are collaborating on starting a second group that will meet at the café on East Main Street.

  • A pair of business owners are starting a book discussion group.

    Becky Harrison of Lincolns Loft already has organized one book club that meets at the Lincoln Square bookstore at 5:30 p.m. Thursdays. The group discussed “Under the Banner of Heaven,” a true story about a Mor­mon murderer, by Jon Krakauer on Oct. 16.

    Harrison and Gale Schmittou of Cozy Café are collaborating on starting a second group that will meet at the café on East Main Street.

  • A pair of business owners are starting a book discussion group.

    Becky Harrison of Lincolns Loft already has organized one book club that meets at the Lincoln Square bookstore at 5:30 p.m. Thursdays. The group discussed “Under the Banner of Heaven,” a true story about a Mor­mon murderer, by Jon Krakauer on Oct. 16.

    Harrison and Gale Schmittou of Cozy Café are collaborating on starting a second group that will meet at the café on East Main Street.

  • U.S. Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell announced earlier this month that both chambers of Congress approved his request of $8.57 million for agriculture research and development projects at several of Kentucky’s universities. The funding is included in the FY 2010 Agriculture Appropriations conference report, which awaits the president’s signature.

    “With this funding, students, faculty, and farmers from across the Commonwealth of Kentucky can continue to make strides in agricultural innovation and research,” McConnell said.

  • Severe soil compaction can reduce yields, especially in corn-soybean rotations.

    To maximize profits, grain producers must identify fields where soil compaction limits production and carry out appropriate remedies only in those fields. Since compaction usually is not uniform in a field, it is necessary to assess several areas within each field to determine the extent and severity of the problem.

  • Severe soil compaction can reduce yields, especially in corn-soybean rotations.

    To maximize profits, grain producers must identify fields where soil compaction limits production and carry out appropriate remedies only in those fields. Since compaction usually is not uniform in a field, it is necessary to assess several areas within each field to determine the extent and severity of the problem.