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Today's Features

  • LaRue County Health Department

    According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, about 7,500 lives have been saved by the proper use of child restraints during the past 20 years. Yet, motor vehicle crashes still remain the number one killer of children ages 4 to 14 in America. The reason? Too often it is the improper use or non-use of child safety seats and booster seats.

  • A few hundred feet down Hall-Gaddie Road, about a mile south of Lincoln Farm, is an attention-getting sign nailed onto a utility pole.

    “Welcome to Gaddieville. Bobbie Gaddie, Mayor,” the sign states.

    Although the “town” isn’t officially incorporated, the residents certainly have a legitimate claim to it, for the Gaddie family has owned that land through four generations, more than 100 years.

  • The small puppy, cupped in the hands of Taylor County Animal Shelter Director John Harris, looks around at his new home. In the background, a chorus of barks erupts and the puppy’s ears perk up.

    He may have a new home, but he’s not alone. This animal shelter is full.

    And, according to Harris, the shelter is applying for grant funding to expand for a third time.

  • Baseball cards, stamps, coins and even rocks have helped create extensive collections for many people. However, there are few collections that can be truly meaningful for an entire community like the recent find by Carl Howell, Hodgenville attorney and Lincoln historian.

    Howell’s grandfather built the Nancy Lincoln Inn near the Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historic Park and helped him develop his love for history, specifically for Abraham Lincoln. Now, he excitedly shares the news of his latest discovery with hopes that it will inspire interest and further research.

  • A Hodgenville funeral home is under new management after the retirement of a long-time employee.

    Billy Howell, director of Billy Howell Funeral Chapel on Lincoln Boulevard, retired in October after an extended illness. He now is living with relatives.

    Rondal Wright, who has owned the funeral home nine years, began looking for a new manager. He turned to Ron Rust, a Lyons Station native who owned funeral homes in New Haven and Boston and is a close friend of Howell.

  • Most of us contemplate what God is thinking when he allows bizarre or terrible things to happen in our lives. Why does such a loving God allow homes, relationships and even families to be broken? 

    Rusty Wilson, youth minister at Union Christian Church, addresses those questions in his upcoming album titled, “I’ll make It Heaven.” This Christian centered, 11-track album talks about relationships – friendships, romantic relationships, families and ultimately our relationship with Christ.

  • It is interesting to note in the gospels the blending of the humanity and divinity of Jesus. Jesus was in a boat with the disciples. Weary, he fell asleep. A storm caused the disciples to wake him asking, “Master, don’t you care that we perish?” Jesus rose and said, “Peace be still!” The waters obeyed his command. You can see his humanity in his tiredness and you see his divinity as the waves obey his command. The humanity and divinity of Jesus is apparent from the beginning of his ministry.

  • In 742 on a cold, blistering winter day, King Pepin III (Pepin the Short) was expecting a child. The child was named Carolus Magnus, also known as Charlemagne. Charlemagne didn’t receive proper education as a child. His childhood was overtaken by the laborious task of the activities of preparing himself to control his father’s lands.

  • Skipping breakfast can spell disaster. A study that randomly assigned overweight people to a weight program found that those who consumed breakfast lost significantly more weight over a 12-week program. This could be because those who skip breakfast tend to select more calorie-dense foods later in the day, than those who regularly eat breakfast. A healthy breakfast is the one meal that people should be encouraged to eat even if they are not hungry.

    This information is from the Web site foodandhealth.com:

    Practical solutions to manage your weight 

  • The Peace Officers Professional Standards Act celebrated its 10th anniversary in 2009. The Act requires standardized, detailed and ongoing training for its officers.

    Basic recruits, before they hit the streets, undergo a strict 18-week basic training regimen at one of four Kentucky facilities. Kentucky’s primary training is handled in Richmond.  The Kentucky State Police has its own academy as do Lexington and Louisville.