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Today's Features

  • The Hardin and LaRue Diabetes Coalition will meet 6 p.m. June 8 at the Lincoln Trail District Health Department, 108 New Glendale Road, Elizabethtown. For more information, contact Melissa Conder at 769-1601, Ext. 1035.

    Managing meals

    The program “Managing Your Meals” will be 9-10 a.m. June 21 at the Lincoln Museum Community Room. The initial class will go over how to follow a meal plan, and gather necessary information to develop a meal plan for each individual.

  • Cornhole for Crusade

    Cornhole for Crusade for Children will be June 5 at Bonnieville games parking lot. Signup at 10 a.m., play begins at noon. $20 per team, 50 percent payback. For more information and directions, call 270-531-1515 or 369-6292.

    UK basketball camp

  • The Hodgenville Rotary Club is looking beyond borders and building relationships with other Rotarians overseas this month.

    As participants in Rotary International’s annual exchange program, the Hodgenville Rotary Club is hosting a team of representatives from Rotary Clubs in the East Midlands Region of the United Kingdom. As acting hosts, the Hodgenville chapter will provide experiences in both professional growth and tourism.

  • When Jaden McBride was born with multiple heart defects and underwent several major surgeries, his parents were surrounded by the love and support of the community and beyond. Now, two years later, James and Kacey McBride want to give back.

    Jaden was born on March 18, 2008, and it was discovered that he had five heart defects. On the same day, he was taken to Kosair Children’s Hospital in Louisville for open-heart surgery. This was the beginning a long road of surgeries and treatments for the little boy.

  • USDA’s Natural Resource Conservation Service is accepting applications from woodland owners interested in having a conservation activity plan for forest management developed for their lands. Owners of woodland who have never had a forest management plan developed, or have a plan needing revision (older than five years), are applying for the Conservation Activity Plan for Forest Management through the Environmental Quality Incentives Program.

  • With hay season under way, now is the time for farmers to think about ways to store the hay they produce this year to reduce storage losses.

    The most common storage method is leaving large round bales stored outside on the ground. This method requires no investment but leaves hay out in the weather resulting in the largest possible dry matter loss. Storage losses can run up to 30 percent or more during a normal year.

  • LaRue County 4-Hers participated in Area Rally Day.

    Michaela Rock took champion in Junior Animal Science, champion in Junior Theatrical, blue in Junior Vocal and 12-year-old speech category.

    Sierra Mullins took champion in Junior Foods Demonstration and champion in Junior Theatrical.

    Kenzi Langley was the champion in the Senior Vocal Category. She sang “Broken Wing.”

    Taylor Campbell was the champion in the Senior Instrumental Division.

  • The LaRue County Public Library is extending its hours on a trial basis.

    For  three months, the library will stay open longer "to explore the benefit of changing our hours long term," Director Niki Carter said.

    The library is now pen from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday and from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturdays.

  • We have set the following dates for Main Street events. We hope you will make note of them, too. June 15 is our annual board meeting; July 15 we will sponsor a STAR workshop; Aug. 7 will be Family Fun Day; Sept. 11 is the date for the annual Main Street dinner/concert/auction; Lincoln Days is Oct. 2-3; Nov. 15-17, will be setup time for Festival of Trees; Nov. 18-20 the festival is open; Nov. 20 is Christmas on the Square. Another workshop is not yet scheduled but will teach participants how to preserve photos, documents and scrapbooks for the family and community history.

  • As the political campaign season heats up, Kentucky Department of Highways crews face an increasing number of campaign signs on the state highway right of way – signs that must be removed for safety purposes.

    Acting State Highway Engineer Steve Waddle said state highway workers are required to remove and discard hundreds of signs during each election cycle. The signs can pose hazards for drivers and for maintenance crews.