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Today's Features

  • Operation Christmas Child kicks off its National Collection Week today and volunteers at Valley Creek Baptist Church in Elizabethtown will be busy preparing shoeboxes for impoverished children.

    Nonprofit organization Samaritan’s Purse started Operation Christmas Child in 1993, according to a news release. Its goal is to fill empty shoeboxes with school supplies, toys, candy and necessity items. The boxes are hand-delivered to children in more than 100 countries.

  • When you are cooking different types of food, especially meats, do you have a hard time deciding if it’s done yet? Everyone is at risk for a foodborne illness. One effective way to prevent illness is to use a food thermometer to check the internal temperature of meat, poultry and egg dishes.

  • Whether burned alive for Nero's entertainment, tortured during the Middle Ages, or called names by a hateful junior high peer group, Christians have always faced persecution. 

    While Christians and non-Christians alike suffer unjust treatment, persecution implies an intentional and systematic infliction of suffering or hardship because of a person's beliefs. Some believers are persecuted simply for speaking the truth. 

  • The Psalmist said, “Let everything that hath breath praise the Lord. Praise ye the Lord!” We need to look for things to be thankful for. A thankful spirit should be the foundation of our lives.  

  • LaRue County breast cancer survivors Kathy Ross and Suzann McCoy were certified as Reach to Recovery volunteers this past weekend. This program, a part of the American Cancer Society, is a nationwide effort serving thousands of people confronting breast cancer- either as patients or as family and friends of patients.

    McCoy and Ross, when notified by the physician or the patient, will provide information and support to those battling the disease in the form of home or phone visits.

  • It was front page news when the Boundary Oak died.

    An impressive figure, the tree was six feet wide and 90 feet tall with a crown that spread 115 feet. A tree of that size casts quite a shadow.

    Its fame came not from its size but from the unique spot of Kentucky soil where the acorn fell. About a quarter century after it sprouted, a surveyor used the oak as a point of reference on a deed for the Sinking Springs farm.

  • The decorated Christmas trees, wreaths and garlands that are part of the annual Festival of Trees will be on display at The Lincoln Museum Community Room on Lincoln Square in Hodgenville through Saturday, Nov. 19.
    That’s the last day to participate in a silent auction, bidding on seasonal items for local nonprofits.
    The public can vote for their favorite tree or wreath. A “People’s Choice,” based on votes will receive $25.
    The Festival will be open to the public 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Nov. 16-18 and noon-7:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 19.

  • Middle Creek Baptist Church “Wednesday night kids” put together 16 Operation Christmas Child Shoeboxes for delivery to impoverished countries. There were 11 children in attendance – all excited to help make Christmas better for others.

  • The Heartland Dulcimer Club released this year its third CD, which has a Christmas theme.

    “Christmas in the Heartland” offers Christmas favorites such as “Angels We Have Heard on High,” “Good King Wenceslas” and “Go Tell it on the Mountain” along with several other tracks.

    CDs can be purchased from club members for $15 or on the club website www.heartlanddulcimerclub.org.

  • Some of the most cynical scams target service members, their families, and veterans, warns the Better Business Bureau. Veterans’ Day is a key opportunity for scammers who would target those who are serving or have served their nation, especially elderly vets.

    BBB Military Line provides free financial literacy and consumer protection services to the military community, as well as information on the latest scams, schemes, and ID theft tactics that threaten them. Among the scams to watch out for: