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Today's Features

  •  Charles R. Crain of Magnolia, an instructor of business at Campbellsville University, will be the speaker at the Jan. 18 luncheon of the LaRue County Chamber of Commerce.

  • For Eli Whitlock, a cancer diagnosis led him to one of the healthiest times in his life.
    The 25-year-old Magnolia resident lost more than 100 pounds after deciding to change his lifestyle after receiving a cancer diagnosis four years ago.
    Whitlock was diagnosed with testicular cancer in the summer of 2008 and had surgery days after learning of the disease. He didn’t need any other treatment to become cancer-free and he felt he “got off pretty lucky with that,” he said.

  •  The Lincoln Trail District Health Department is starting a monthly Diabetes Support Group in Hodgenville. It will meet 6:30-7:30 p.m. on the third Thursday at the LaRue County Extension Office at 807 Old Elizabethtown Road.

    This will be for everyone, those who have been dealing with diabetes for years and also for those who are newly diagnosed. Come learn from others how they are managing this disease.

  •  Hazel Denham has learned in her 70 years of hairdressing experience that customers tend to love the styles they wore when they were young.

    She is no exception with her careful posture, crossed legs and simple but neat blouse and dress pants. Her favorite hairstyle is from the 1930s – a smooth permanent press associated with early-20th century glamour.

    The 91-year-old Hodgenville resident has seen the death and resurgence of many looks, including the French twist and the page boy, since she saved for her first permanent wave machine in the 1930s.

  •  When Hazel Denham walked into a beauty salon in Glasgow for her first-ever permanent as a sophomore at Temple Hill High School, she knew then and there what she wanted as a career.

    “There was just something about the friendliness in the shop, the interesting way the operator fixed not only mine but others' hair, I just felt I had a knack for it, and from that day I decided to be a beautician.”

    Her career prediction proved to be accurate as she has styled hair at Hodgenville's Powder Puff for 61 years and has owned it for over 55 years.

  • Bookmobile schedule

    Jan. 11 – Kingdom Kids, Senior Center, Taylor Mills

    Jan. 12 – First Friends, preschool, Evenstart, LaRue County Middle School

    Jan. 17  - Headstart, Country Lane Road, Ford Road, Childress Road, Despain Road, Greensburg Road

    Jan. 18 – New Freedom Church, Alvin Brooks Road, Carter Brothers Road, Tonieville Road

    Jan. 19 – Laugh & Learn, Kids Crew, Nationwide Uniform, Abraham Lincoln Elementary School

  • Leadership Kentucky, Inc., one of the oldest and most prestigious leadership development programs in the nation, seeks qualified applicants from LaRue County for the Class of 2012.

    After 28 years of providing annual leadership development programs in Kentucky, there remain 22 counties from which there has been no class participation. Through a project initiated by the members of the Leadership Kentucky Class of 2009, scholarship dollars of up to one-half of tuition are available for a qualified applicant from LaRue County.

  • The dental clinic at Elizabethtown Community and Technical College is now accepting patients.

    Services include cleanings, x-rays, fluoride treatments, sealants and exams by a dentist. Cost is $45; $35 for students, children age 12 and under, and senior citizens (age 65 and older).

    For patients new to the clinic or returning patients who have not been seen in the last three years, an initial screening appointment is necessary prior to being scheduled for preventive services.

  •  I laughed as I watched a new sitcom, “Two Broke Girls,” when one of the girls told a rude gold dealer that she was going to turn her in to the chamber of commerce. In reality she would have needed to turn her in to the Better Business Bureau.

    This prompted me to write this article because it reminded me that some people do not have a clear understanding of the purpose of the chamber of commerce.