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Today's Features

  • The Cabinet for Health and Family Services announced that $24 million in federal funding has been released to Kentucky to help low-income families heat their homes this winter.

    Central Kentucky Community Action will take applications for the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Pro­gram  through Dec. 16. LIHEAP helps families pay their energy bills, particularly during the very cold and hot months.

  • The Frazier History Museum is featuring historic photographs from LaRue County, along with other areas of Kentucky as part of “Rough Road: The Kentucky Documentary Photographic Project 1975-1977,” a new exhibit which runs through Jan. 15.

  • While Jerry Williams and Ken Baldwin were putting the finishing touches to their Christmas CD, “Strings and Bows,” last year at Williams’ home on North Lincoln Boulevard in Hodgenville, the two planted a seed idea for another album of a completely different nature.
    “I’m a Civil War buff and, since the War occurred 150 years ago, I thought that putting together a mixture of traditional and original songs with a flavor of the period would be a timely project,” said Williams.

  • Sunrise Manor Volunteers’ Executive Board voted to help fund Christmas presents for Adult Day Care participants by holding a bake sale, featuring homemade cookies and  candy, Dec. 16 at the  facility’s gift shop.
    At the board’s Nov. 1 meeting, Tickle Ragland, historian, reported that the scrapbook is almost up to date, but she needs pictures of volunteer activities.  Ann Easton reported  $4,398.15 in the organization’s treasury.

  • Although Magnolia resident Tickle Ragland and Sharon Meisenheimer, who lives in Walnut, Ill., have exchanged letters for 65 years, neither pen pal knew until recently that Sharon’s husband Lester has relatives buried in LaRue County.
    “We knew Lester’s grandparents came from Hodgenville and moved to Illinois where they were buried, but we didn’t know where the rest of his family was buried,” Sharon said.  

  • CKAG holds ‘Five by Twenty’ exhibit
    The Central Kentucky Art Guild Gallery in the Hardin County History Museum is featuring an exhibit “Five by Twenty” beginning Nov. 9. Twenty artists have agreed to paint the same five objects in a painting using their own style. The exhibit will be available for viewing during regular museum hours. The public is encouraged to stop by and search for the items in the paintings. For more information, call Mary Lou Hall at 765-7156.

  • Sonora Veterans Memorial Park
    A chili supper fundraiser for Sonora Veterans Memorial Park will be 4-8 p.m. Nov. 12 at the Farm Harvest Market (Paul Stewart Sonora Market) on Western Avenue. Barbecue sandwiches, hotdogs and desserts also available. Items priced individually.

    Fundraiser breakfast
    B.R. Young Masonic Lodge #132 will have all-you-can-eat pancakes, sausage and bacon 8-10 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 12 for $5. Proceeds benefit building fund. For more information, call 234-4223.

  • Loaded potato luncheon at First Baptist Church
    First Baptist Church Living Strong Relay for Life team is sponsoring a loaded potato, garden salad and homemade dessert luncheon noon Nov. 13 in the FBC gym. The cost of the meal is a donation.
     
    Refreshments at Veirs auction
    Veirs Crew Relay for Life team is selling refreshments at the Veirs auction on Fork Road 1 p.m. Nov. 19. Proceeds benefit Relay.
     

  • Gatlin Constant is a young man who puts words into action when it comes to doing good for others.
    For the eighth straight year, the 12-year-old LaRue County Middle School sixth grade student is dedicating himself to helping others in need during the holiday season.
    “It makes me feel good to be able to give to others, especially around Christmas, because that’s when we received the greatest gift of all,” he said.

  • With a knack for crocheting and a will to help others Hodgenville resident Martha Childress learned in February the art of crocheting plastic grocery bags into sleeping mats for the homeless.
    Childress was introduced to the concept by the Bowling Green Community Action and immediately took a liking to it.
    Since learning how to crochet the mats, which take about 40 hours to complete, Childress has taught numerous other groups, organizations and individuals the art of helping others through creating the mats.