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Today's Features

  • Decluttering your closet is a liberating experience. Life begins to feel more manageable and your clothing and shoes are better suited to who you are now.
    If tackling all of the closets at once is to too daunting, set aside a firm two-hours each week and clear one room’s closet at a time. Start by getting four large boxes. Label them keep, throw out, donate and not sure.

  • COLUMN: DIANA LEATHERS, COMMUNITY HEALTH EDUCATOR

    Few cancers are as easily prevented as colon cancer. Yet in Kentucky, about 2,600 new cases will be diagnosed each year and about 900 people will die.  March is National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. Call your doctor and ask about a screening test that's right for you. Routine screening is highly effective. Nine out of 10 colon cancers may be prevented or cured if detected early.  

  • It would be difficult to top becoming a contestant on “American Idol.”

    But for Hodgenville teen Kenzi Lewis, a trip to Rupp Arena comes close.

    The 15-year-old has been chosen to sing the National Anthem at the boys' Sweet 16 basketball tournament March 19. She will perform at the 10 a.m. semi-final session.

    Lewis drew plenty of attention last month when she appeared on American Idol. She was sent home after “group night.”

    She earned the trip to Hollywood from her audition last summer in Nashville, Tenn.

  • Sierra Enlow, a LaRue County High School graduate, has been named Kentucky Cherry Blossom Princess.

    She was selected to represent the Kentucky Society of Washington D.C. and will be representing the state at the Cherry Blossom Festival April 3-9 in Washington D.C.

    Each princess is selected by her state society, territory or country to be cultural ambassadors for the National Conference of State Societies for a one-year reign.

  • The brain is an amazing organ. It controls all bodily functions, all organs, thoughts, emotions, memory and ability to be self-aware. Like other body parts, it is natural for the brain to lose some its sharpness; but it can deteriorate even more if you do not take care of it. 

  • The Hosparus Thrift Shoppe in Elizabethtown is selling new and gently used formal dresses for the approaching prom season. The Shoppe recently received a donation of new dresses, sizes 8-24, in a variety of styles and colors and they are $20 each. The Shoppe is accepting donations of new and gently used formalwear.

    Moira Taylor, Shoppe manager, encourages donations of last season's dresses. "It's a great way to recycle a dress that can't be worn again and it will help a great cause," she said. Donations of tuxedos are also welcome.

  • Two members of Cub Scout Pack 151, Cody Parrott and Dylan Grimes, achieved the Arrow of Light, the highest rank possible as a Cub Scout at a Blue and Gold ceremony. Pack, Troop and Crew 151 meet 6:30 p.m. every Monday night at First Baptist Church in Hodgenville and welcomes any new boy interested in joining.

  • Campbellsville University's Dr. Wesley Roberts, professor of music, is helping the Elizabethtown Area Sacred Community Choir in its 10th season program with performances March 5 and 6.

    The theme for this year's performance is "Melodious Milestones" and is free and open to the public.

    The first choir performance will be Saturday, March 5 at 7:30 p.m. at St. James Catholic Church in Elizabethtown. The second performance is Sunday, March 6 at 3 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church in Elizabethtown.

  • Chris and Laura Grimes of Buffalo announce the birth of a son, Aydan Paul Grimes.

    Aydan Paul was born at 5:19 p.m. Dec. 28, 2010, at Hardin Memorial Hospital. He was 19-inches long and weighed 7 pounds 4 ounces.

    He has three siblings: Christopher, 22; Chelsey, 20; and Aeryn, 3.

    Maternal grandparents are Carl and Carol Whitman Jr. of Sonora. Paternal grandparents are Gene and Libby Grimes of Hodgenville.

  • The Campbellsville University theater department will present "Trifles and other one-act plays of laughter and suppression" for their spring production.

    The performances will be 7 p.m. March 3-5 and 3 p.m. March 6.

    The show will consist of four, one-act plays that share a common theme, though the plot of each play is unrelated to the other. The four plays are "Trifles," "Suppressed Desires," "Tickless Time" and "The Outside."