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Today's Features

  • “Boys to Men” – an outreach program that seeks to place positive role models in the lives of young boys – will be introduced to the community Oct. 12.

    Rev. Aaron L. Moss, pastor and program director at Lane Lincoln CME Church, said the program “began as a vision from God.”

    “I met with the men at Lane Lincoln CME Church and they just embraced the idea.”

  • PROFESSIONAL
    First – Bill Thomas, Upton – 5 minutes, 8 seconds
    Second – Ray Lee Nunn, Sonora – 7 minutes, 10 seconds
    Third – Jason Nunn, Sonora – 13 minutes, 55 seconds
     
    AMATEUR
    First – Jeremy Nichols – 5 minutes, 8 seconds
    Second – Justin Rock – 5 minutes, 10 seconds
    Third – Jacob Ovesen – 8 minutes, 3 seconds
     
    JUNIOR

  • Last week’s story about the Maxine store contained an inaccuracy.

    Kathy Ross, a granddaughter of Albert Hazle, who built the store, provided the correct information.

    Albert Hazle was born in 1901.

    He and his wife Ora opened the store in the early 1920s. It was located about a quarter mile from the Ky. 357 and 1517 crossroads.

    Ross’ father, Charles “Red” Hazle, was born in Maxine.

  • LCHS Class of 1978
    The LaRue County High School Class of 1978 will have a 35-year reunion Oct. 5 at Sportsman’s Lake in Hodgenville. Cost is $30 per person; $55 per couple. For more information, email larueco1978@gmail.com.

    LCHS Class of 2003

  • Tucked away near Tucker Creek lies Tucker Cemetery.

    Established in the 1850s, the cemetery is located on the west side of highway 357 between Maxine and Tanner; however, it is no longer visible from the road due to surrounding foliage.

    The cemetery, although unknown to passers by, contains the graves of a one-time prominent family of LaRue County – the Tuckers.

    Anderson Tucker and Nancy Hawkins Tucker married in 1820 in Stokes County, N.C., before making the trek to Kentucky in 1842.

  • Oak Hill School was picture perfect with its white painted clapboards, a large post with an iron bell and pull chord out front, and a magnificent cedar tree reaching its branches just behind it.

    Only a few decades ago the one-room schoolhouse stood behind Oak Hill Baptist Church, the first church established in the Maxine area. The school and church were built in the 1850s.

    The family of Anderson and Nancy Tucker were the original owners of the land the school was built on.

  • Oak Hill Baptist Church rests in a bend on Oak Hill Road, surrounded by oak trees –which is how the church received its name.

    A little more than 157 years ago, on April 30, 1856, 35 former members of Three Forks Bacon Creek Baptist Church signed a petition to separate to form Oak Hill Baptist Church.

  • Nancy McCubbin, once a Pennington, grew up in Maxine and watched as the small community changed over the years.

    “It was quite different from today,” said McCubbin.

    “I remember Maxine – Maggard’s store. It was there for years and was more of a general store. They sold a small amount of things that you could get at Wal-Mart today.”

    McCubbin said she grew up living next to the store on Oak Hill Road.