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Today's Features

  • Some people might feel a tinge of nostalgia when they hear the phrase, “Rebeleers, sound off!” It’s the cheer for the East Hardin High School band. Angela Carter wants to hear from those who remember.

    Carter, a 1975 graduate of East Hardin High School, is planning a reunion of the East Hardin Rebeleer Band from 4 to 11 p.m. June 16 at Pritchard Community Center in Elizabethtown. The reunion is open to any member, parent or volunteer who worked with the program. Carter hopes many Rebeleers with fond memories will want to catch up.

  • Residents of central Kentucky have an opportunity to participate in a historic study that has the potential to change the face of cancer for future generations. Men and women between the ages of 30 and 65 who have never been diagnosed with cancer are needed to participate in the American Cancer Society’s Cancer Prevention Study-3.
    CPS-3 will enroll a diverse population of up to half a million people across the United States and Puerto Rico.

  •  Hardin & LaRue Diabetes Coalition to meet

  •  Change in mail collection times at Hodgenville Post Office

  •  Buffalo Baptist to show “Courageous”

  •  The newest addition to the LaRue County Quilt Trail is located at the home of Reed and Angie Smith, 537 Upton Talley Road in Upton. The quilt block design is a Sawtooth Star. 

  • “The easy part about cancer is being a survivor. The hard part is watching others go through it and not make it.”
    Those are the words of Susan Holt, co-captain of LaRue County Relay for Life’s Janet’s Angels team.
    The team, which has formerly been known as the “Tiki Hut Healers,” formed in 1997 in support of then 13-year-old Valerie Holt. Valerie was battling Wilms tumor.

  •  The Kentucky Cancer Program is asking Kentuckians to wear blue March 2 to promote colon cancer screening on the fourth annual “Dress in Blue Day.”

    “Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in Kentucky, despite the fact that it can be successfully treated when detected early,” said Madeline Abramson, honorary chair of the campaign. “Dress in Blue Day serves as a helpful reminder to encourage Kentuckians to get screened, increase awareness and decrease the staggering statistics of this deadly disease.”

  •  If I were God, I would’ve made people with delay devices on their mouths or a filter of some kind.

    For example, when your brain wants to say, “Poodles aren’t real dogs,” before it comes out of your mouth the delay device would kick in and send you a message: “Really? Is that really what you want to say in front of this group of people who may or may not include poodle owners?”

  •  Residents of central Kentucky have an opportunity to participate in a historic study that has the potential to change the face of cancer for future generations. Men and women between the ages of 30 and 65 who have never been diagnosed with cancer are needed to participate in the American Cancer Society's Cancer Prevention Study-3.

    CPS-3 will enroll a diverse population of up to half a million people across the United States and Puerto Rico.