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Today's Features

  •  Food pantry at Church of Christ

  •  Love is more than words. It is courageous and a serving action. When another person consistently pays attention to our words, feelings and needs, we often develop and express a sense of love for that person.  

  •  We have read in church history about the Holy Spirit being so powerful and irresistible that he caused a Pentecost, or revival to break out. Worshippers were “slain in the spirit.” There was jumping, jerking and shaking of the body, while voices were raised in praise to God.

  •  Since the late 1950s, a small building in a remote area of LaRue County has played a role in keeping millions of people safe.

  •  Hardin Memorial Hospital is now offering self-referring screening mammograms. A self-referring patient is a patient who requests to have a mammogram on her own initiative without a medical provider’s order. 

    This is a standard process authorized by the FDA and already in place at many Kentucky hospitals. The primary goal is to engage patients who are currently not accessing preventive healthcare services. Initially, this will be implemented at the Hardin Memorial Hospital’s Women’s Imaging Center and at the Brandenburg Diagnostic Center.

  • As a mother of three daughters and a teacher at Magnolia Elementary, in December 1999 life was going fairly well for this LaRue County lady.

    My oldest daughter had recently married, my other two daughters were successfully midway through their senior and sophomore high school years, and I recently had begun dating a retired Air Force lieutenant colonel. My class was moving along at the expected pace and the Christmas Crazies had not really hit the classroom just yet.

  • That’s right. You saw what you saw.

    Today’s edition of The LaRue County Herald News is printed on pink paper.

    We hope to make a point with the pink paper about Breast Cancer Awareness Month. It is a terrible disease that thousands of people suffer from in this country. Chances are, every reader of this issue has been touched by the disease in some way, whether they or a family member suffer from it, or they know someone who has.

    Inside are stories about breast cancer — who can get it and how steps you can take to reduce your risk.

  • Breast cancer is the second most common cancer among women, second only to lung cancer. One in eight women is expected to develop breast cancer in her lifetime, and a recent survey by the Society for Women’s Health Research found that 22 percent of women named breast cancer as the disease they fear most. The specter of breast cancer makes it no surprise that women are eager to seek various ways to reduce their risks of developing this potentially deadly disease.

  • At the age of 12 to 15, many young women are experiencing the body and life changes that accompany adolescence. It can be difficult to imagine that breasts that are just beginning to develop may contain cancer. But such is the reality for some girls.