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LaRue County Fair moved to June 14-22

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4-H Day is Aug. 3

By Linda Ireland

The longest-continuously running county fair in Kentucky will be one of the earliest this year.
The LaRue County Fair, historically held the first week of August or the last week of July, is scheduled for June 14-22.
Ann “Snookie” Morrison, president of the LaRue County Fair Board, said the earlier date made it possible to book “a better carnival.”
Kissel Brothers Shows will supply 14 to 15 carnival rides, games and food booths.
Morrison said the company is comparable to the carnivals at Nelson and Hardin County Fairs.
“I hope everybody will be pleased,” she said.
Holding the fair early means some vegetable crops will not be ready for entry. But 4-Hers will still have the chance to participate at the county level and advance to the Kentucky State Fair.
The Fair Board, in agreement with the LaRue County Extension office, will have a 4-H Day on Aug. 3.
Games and other events will be held for youth about noon. There will be dog, poultry and horticulture shows.
“We’d like to have a horse show,” said Morrison. “There are only a couple of kids with horses and they are in the Hardin County 4-H group.”
She’s heard mixed reactions about holding a “split-fair” but her main goal is “the 4-H kids will be taken care of to go to state.”
The fair in June will have many of the traditional events –  beauty and baby pageants, tractor pull, livestock shows, demolition derby and mud racing.
There will be no mule show or wrestling this year.
The gospel singing on Friday, June 21, will be revamped, according to Fair board member Tom Smith.
Groups from five local churches will sing. Performers include Witness from First Baptist Church, Salem Christian Church, Rolling Fork Christian Church and First Union Baptist Church in Upton. Nine-year-old Kaylee Whitman and 8-year-old Graham West also will sing.
A new event on Saturday, June 15, is David Davis with his trick horses and the Kentucky Cowboy Mounted Shooters.
Davis and his black and white overo horses appear at cowboy church services, horse shows, rodeos and training clinics.
The mounted shooters will shoot .45 caliber single action revolvers (loaded with blanks) from horseback during their part of the show, according to Smith. Their targets will be balloons on poles at a distance of about 15 feet.
The group puts on “armed robbery” shows for the Kentucky Railway Museum, Smith said.
The 2013 Fair Book will be published May 29 and included with The LaRue County Herald News for local customers.